B.C. Election 2017: Lieutenant-governor asks Christy Clark to govern

B.C. Election 2017: Lieutenant-governor asks Christy Clark to govern

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Rob Shaw

B.C Liberal party leader Christy Clark arrives at the Liberal HQ to speak to supporters after the Provincial election, Vancouver, May 10 2017.
B.C Liberal party leader Christy Clark arrives at the Liberal HQ to speak to supporters after the Provincial election, Vancouver, May 10 2017.GERRY KAHRMANN / PNG

B.C. Lieutenant-governor Judith Guichon has asked Premier Christy Clark to continue to govern the province with her current minority of seats.

Clark and Guichon spoke this morning by phone, and she also spoke to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

“The voters are never wrong,” Clark told media Wednesday. “And we got a result from the voters and British Columbians told us what they wanted really out of this election is they wanted to make sure we do things different, they elected a really significant Green presence… so I intend to listen to that.”

Clark said she’s still waiting for the outcome of absentee ballots, but whether she maintains a minority government or grows a majority she intends to “do government differently, a lot less fighting, a lot less yelling.”

“Whatever the outcome is, whether it’s a minority or a majority I do intend to work across party lines,” she said. She also said she’ll lead a change in dialogue in government.

Clark also singled out B.C. Green Leader Andrew Weaver as collaborative, and said she spoke to him last night and realizes the electorate wants him to play a larger role in the legislature.

B.C. Green party leader Andrew Weaver speaks to supporters at election headquarters at the Delta Ocean Pointe on election night in Victoria, B.C., on , Wednesday, May 10, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS / CHAD HIPOLITO

“I’ve had a good relationship with working with Dr. Weaver in the past, he’s a smart thoughtful reasonable guy,” she said.

Clark said she hopes to speak to NDP Leader John Horgan later Wednesday.

The move will theoretically allow Clark to reconvene the legislature at a time of her choosing, where she would have to pass a throne speech, budget and other legislation.

And it would appear, at least temporarily, to dampen the immediate possibility of a coalition government between the NDP and Greens.

However, there are at least four ridings in which recounts are likely and one, in Courtenay-Comox, where the margin of victory was only nine votes and could be changed when the absentee and out-of-district advance ballots are tallied during Elections B.C.’s final count, beginning May 22.

Depending on the outcome, it could shift either the NDP or Liberals into a majority government situation.