Entertainment

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New Delhi : The ‘Jurassic World’ sequel is just a year away and now, it has an official title!

Universal Pictures took to its Twitter handle to share the first poster for the sequel, revealing its official title – ‘Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.’

The image, bearing some fiery debris, echoes back to the very first movie with the tagline, “Life Finds a Way” – a line Jeff Goldblum says in ‘Jurassic Park.’

Goldblum, who starred in the first two films in the ’90s, will reprise his role as Ian Malcolm in the new film.

Jurassic World stars Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard return as raptor trainer Owen Grady and love interest and park operations manager Claire Dearing.

The sequel is scheduled to hit the theatres on June 22, 2018.

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By CHRIS CIOLLI

Mixing with the locals is the fastest way to the heart of a place—and it’s easier than ever, thanks to Airbnb, Couchsurfing, Eatwith and the like. There’s only one catch—you think Paris’ transit system is tricky? Try navigating the wildly varying cultural norms across Europe. There’s nothing quite so deflating as meeting new people, and promptly (however inadvertently) offending them. See our best tips below.

1. Don’t give flowers as a gift.
Flowers’ symbolic meanings vary widely by country: In Latvia, red roses are for funerals, not valentines. Chrysanthemums are the French funerary flower. In Germany, yellow roses mean the host’s partner is cheating, lilies are for funerals, and heather is associated with cemeteries. Throughout Europe, even-numbered bouquets are considered bad luck, as are groups of 13.

2. Follow locals’ lead when it comes to alcohol.
In Spain, wait to take a first drink until after the first toast and you only toast with alcohol, not water or soft drinks. Keep quiet and don’t drink until a toast—no matter how long-winded—is finished in Georgia and Azerbaijan. In France, don’t refill your wine glass without first offering refills to the rest of the table; forget bringing wine to dinner, the host will want to select a vintage that pairs with the meal. In Russia, vodka should never be refused—it’s a symbol of friendship—and toss it back neat, sipping is considered rude. In Germany, looking people in the eyes when you toast is mandatory—on threat of 7 years bad luck in the bedroom.

3. Don’t let your clothes send the wrong message.
Generally speaking, Europeans dress more formally than Americans, even for something as simple as a trip to the supermarket. But beyond a prevailing societal norm that workout gear is only acceptable for exercise, there are also more specific, regional rules when it comes to clothing that may catch you by surprise if you don’t do your research. In Romania, don’t shake hands with your gloves on. Take your overcoat off indoors—in Russia and parts of the former Soviet Union, to do otherwise implies your hosts do not properly heat their home. In Czech Republic, stay buttoned up in business meetings, at least until the highest-ranking person in attendance removes his or her jacket. In Poland, and many parts of Europe, it’s considered impolite to speak to people with your hands in your pockets.

4. Mind your gestures.
Even the most essential of gestures can mean very different things than they do in your home country, so avoid using gestures until you’re sure you know what they mean at a destination. In Bulgaria, locals shake their heads yes and nod no. Making the peace sign, or “v” for victory is the equivalent of flipping your middle finger in Ireland and the UK. In Italy, Spain, France, Greece and former Yugoslavia extending your index finger and pinkie and shaking your fist in the “rock on” gesture, is tantamount to taunting the person you point it at about a cheating partner, whereas in Norway it’s the sign of the devil. Skip the “okay” sign, too—in France, Portugal and Greece it simply signifies “no good” or “useless” but in Turkey and Malta when you curl your thumb and index finger into a circle you’re comparing people to a very private part of your anatomy. Flicking someone’s ear is a homosexual slur in Italy, and cracking your knuckles is considered obscene in Belgium.

5. Save your smile for the right occasion.
In many parts of Europe the easiest way to identify an American on vacation is by their seemingly aimless grin for the world at large. Flashing your happy face in a business setting is considered unprofessional in Russia. In France and Czech Republic smiles are reserved for friends and families, rarely bestowed on strangers.

6. Respect local coffee culture.
Few things are more likely to scandalize the locals and get you a frosty reception at a café or restaurant than botching your coffee order. Don’t order cappuccino after breakfast in Italy, or espresso before or during a meal. In Spain, café con leche may be ordered at breakfast or as an afternoon pick-me-up, but shouldn’t be ordered with any meals after midday. If you must have a white coffee after dinner, try a cortado—an espresso cut with a splash of milk. In Austria’s historic coffee culture, the worst mistake visitors make is trying to generically order a coffee, an offense in a culture with a multitude of options.

7. Leave your chewing gum at home.
In Europe, walking around with a wad of chewing gum in your jaw isn’t just uncommon, it’s often regarded as impolite. Most Europeans chew gum briefly after a meal, and spit it out in short order. In the Netherlands, chewing gum while talking is considered rude, and in Belgium and France, chewing gum at all is considered vulgar.

8. Time is relative.
Concepts of time and punctuality vary across Europe. In the Netherlands, being early, even to the tune of 5 minutes, is unacceptable. In Germany, punctuality is a matter of respect for other people’s time. In Spain, Italy and France, being 5-10 minutes late is considered within the norm, and not frowned upon, even in many professional settings. In Poland, for informal events in people’s homes, always arrive 15 minutes later than the agreed upon time to allow the host to prepare, but not more than 30 minutes late.

While doing some research ahead of time will help, you’re bound to commit a few faux pas on your travels. The bottom line: Don’t sweat it. Some of my biggest bumbles have made for my most memorable travel experiences, like when an elderly Greek baker with massive, arthritic hands lectured me in her halting English about rude gestures when I used the “ok” sign to confirm my order of a spiral-shaped Skopelitiki pastry, or the time I almost toasted with a glass of lemon Fanta to the horror of my Spanish friends.

https://www.afar.com

Surrey Board of Trade’s 20th annual Police Officer of the Year Awards hosted on October 6, 2016 at the Guildford Sherton Hotel in Surrey

Surrey, October 6, 2016 Surrey RCMP officers, auxiliaries, support staff, and volunteers were recognized at the Surrey Board of Trade’s 20th annual Police Officer of the Year Awards for their exemplary service and commitment to making Surrey a safer place to live and do business.

Sergeant Lyndsay O’Ruaric was named this year’s Police Officer of the Year (as nominated by the community) for her work leading the detachment’s Special Victims Unit team that works at Sophie’s Place Child Advocacy Centre. Sgt. O’Ruaric was recognized for her commitment to the long-term care and support of vulnerable children who have experienced trauma.

Constable Chris Jones was named this year’s Police Officer of the Year (as nominated by his peers) for his passion for justice and genuine care for the vulnerable and exploited of our community as a member of the Surrey RCMP’s Special Victims Unit.

Other award winners included:

  • Auxiliary Constable Mark Elson – Auxiliary Constable of the Year
  • Jody Nelson – Municipal Employee of the Year
  • D’Arcy Nelson – Volunteer of the Year
  • Priority Target Offender Unit – Arnold Silzer Community Policing Initiative Award
  • Domestic Violence Unit – Police Team Award
  • Sophie’s Place Child Advocacy Centre – Police and Business Partnership Award

I am very proud of the work of this detachment and the community in continuously striving to create a healthier and safer Surrey, says Assistant Commissioner Bill Fordy, Lower Mainland District Commander. The strong partnership that exists between the police and the local business community here is evident. I thank the Surrey Board of Trade for hosting this event for 20 years and the businesses that have supported this event, year after year.

The relationship between business and the RCMP is important because we are both working towards a healthy and safe community for our residents and businesses, says Anita Patil Huberman, CEO, Surrey Board of Trade. The Surrey Board of Trade celebrates the work of the Surrey RCMP because they do excellent work in ensuring the safety of our city and our businesses. Their jobs are not easy. Their innovation, work ethic, and cross-collaboration make the Surrey RCMP leaders in Canada. In this 20th anniversary, the Surrey Board of Trade is proud to celebrate the Surrey RCMP in this unique event in Canada.

Congratulations to all award winners and nominees. Partial proceeds from this event go towards the RCMP Youth Academy.

Goodbye, Canada. We’ll be back. That was the promise Saturday from the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

— Image Credit: Ken Sakamoto / Black Press
 by  Staff Writer – Victoria News

The Duke of Cambridge gave a heartfelt thank you to Canadians for welcoming the Royal couple and their children so warmly.

Prince William’s speech came during the final day of the week-long visit to B.C. and Yukon with Kate, Prince George and Princess Charlotte.

“Catherine and I are incredibly grateful to the people of Canada for the warmth and hospitality they have extended to our family over the last week. We have loved our time in British Columbia and Yukon and will never forget the beautiful places we have seen and the many people who have been kind enough to come to welcome us in person.

“We feel very lucky to have been able to introduce George and Charlotte to Canada. This country will play a big part in the lives of our children and we have created such happy memories for our family during this visit.

“Canada is a country of optimism, generosity and unrivalled natural beauty. I hope we have helped all Canadians celebrate what makes this country great. We will see you again soon.”

Well-wishers were enthralled by the sight of the waving children, Prince George and Prince Charlotte, from the floatplane dock before beginning their journey home to Kensington Palace.

Thousands of onlookers cheered and clapped as the royals walked along the floating dock to board their flight.

Prince George, 3, wearing red shorts and a sweater, waved both hands enthusiastically at the spectators. He was greeted by flower boy Daniel Brachman, 11, of Victoria. But the young Prince did not exchange high-fives with Brachman. Prince George also refused to high-five Prime Minister Justin Trudeau last week.

Princess Charlotte, wearing a red sweater and a dress, walked along the dock holding her mother, Kate’s, hand. The family faced the crowd and waved before boarding the float plane.

Prince William and his wife Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge

The Duchess of Cambridge greets a large crowd of admirers during the welcoming ceremony at the B.C. legislature on Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016.   Photograph By DARREN STONE, Times Colonist

Prince William and his wife Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, began their week-long tour of British Columbia and the Yukon in Victoria Saturday with a welcome ceremony that honoured Canadian military service, young people and First Nations in front of a lively crowd of thousands.

“Catherine and I have asked to meet as many people from as many walks of life as we can while we’re here,” he said in a speech at the legislature, where an estimated 25,000 people were in the crowd. “We’re very much looking forward to learning about how Canadians are tackling some of the biggest challenges of the day.”

The prince recalled his visit to B.C. as a teenager in the late 1990s, when he was a heartthrob greeted by screaming girls. “We feel very fortunate to have time to get to really know parts of this country that we did not get to visit in 2011 but of which I have very happy memories as a shy teenager,” he said, pausing and grinning. “A few of you remember it too well, I think.”

At the legislature, the crowd’s biggest screams came at the first sight of the royal couple’s children arriving at 443 Maritime Helicopter Squadron at Victoria International airport, shown on a large screen. The Royal Family arrived 10 minutes ahead of schedule on a military plane carrying Prince William’s seal. They were greeted by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau, Premier Christy Clark and her bowtie-sporting teenage son Hamish, Gov. Gen. David Johnston and his wife Sharon, and Lt. Gov. Judith Guichon.

The Prince William emerged from the plane holding the hand of three-year-old Prince George, dressed in a light blue sweater and shorts. Kate — wearing a blue maple leaf hat by British design house Lock and Co. and the Queen’s maple leaf brooch — carried 16-month-old Princess Charlotte. Prince George appeared more interested in a Sea King helicopter landing at the base than he did in the official receiving line, while Princess Charlotte waved goodbye to the plane.

This was the first of two public appearances the children will make during the visit. The second will be at their departure from Victoria at the downtown seaplane terminal on Oct. 1.

The family left in a motorcade of two dozen vehicles that stopped at Government House, where they will stay for the week, before heading to the legislature. People stood on the side of the highway from the airport to downtown Victoria cheering and taking photos as the royal motorcade passed. Overpasses were packed with waving people. The windows of the car carrying the royals were down so that they could wave back.

Some of the thousands waiting at the legislature lawn had staked out spots before dawn.

“We got here around 6:15 a.m. and a few other ladies were already here,” said Sarah Larson, who drove down from Courtenay with her mother Gloria Zimmer Friday night.

“It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity to see them … I’ve been researching royal stuff all week,” said Larson, who sat on a blanket alongside the red carpet walkway with snacks, travel Boggle and enough crosswords to fill the day. Larson also prepared a bouquet with the Canadian and Union Jack flags and small picture of a friend who died. “She was a major royals fan. She would have loved this.”

Emily Emery and her mother Jill Boudreau drove from Mount Vernon, Washington, for the event. “I admire their work and how they use their celebrity for good. They’re big on children’s health and as a nurse, I admire them,” Emery said.

Patrick Wilson stood for nearly 12 hours at a metal gate along the red carpet to see the royal couple. He said as a First Nations person, from the north Island Kwakiutl First Nation, it is meaningful for him to see the Royal Family’s interest in B.C.’s Indigenous peoples. “I don’t have the words for it but it’s good,” said Wilson, wearing a cedar bark top hat.

The royal couple arrived at the legislature around 5:30 p.m., about a half hour behind schedule.

A solemn ceremony at the legislature cenotaph marked the start of the ceremony, featuring the skirl of bagpipes and a lone bugler.

The cheerful crowd grew silent as Kate and William placed a wreath at the cenotaph. Retired colonel Paul Paone, who was with the Canadian Forces in Afghanistan, was happy to see a new plaque honouring Afghanistan veterans unveiled. “It’s absolutely wonderful,” he said. “It took long enough.”

William and Kate spoke at length with three veterans, including Gordon Quan, who served as a commando in Burma during the Second World War.

Also meeting the royal pair were Afghanistan veterans Cpl. Mireille Poulin and Petty Officer Wayne Clarke. Prince William, who flew helicopters in the Royal Air Force, asked Poulin what kind of helicopters were used in the Royal Canadian Air Force.

The royal couple was welcomed to traditional Lekwungen territory by Esquimalt and Songhees dancers as they walked the red carpet to the stage with the prime minister and his wife, the Governor General and his wife, the lieutenant governor, and the premier and her son. They were met by a line of local politicians, including Mayor Lisa Helps, First Nations chiefs, Victoria MLA Carole James and federal Green Party Leader Elizabeth May.

In his speech, the Governor General noted that the royal couple first came to Canada in 2011 as newlyweds of three months, “and now you’ve come back as a family. We couldn’t be happier for you,” he said. For Canada, the monarchy “represents a family and reminds us that people come first.”

Trudeau got a few laughs when he jested about travelling with kids. “As any parent who has travelled with children knows, it is a whole different experience when you bring your family with you. I want to commend you and thank you for introducing our part of the world to Prince George and Princess Charlotte,” he said.

“Though let me caution you from my own experience, if they’re anything like our kids, getting them back on a plane after a visit to our beautiful West Coast will really be a challenge.”

William and Kate rewarded many of the fans who’d spent hours waiting to see them with greetings as they walked along the red carpet after the ceremony.

“He said he liked my flower,” said Teresa Bell, who shook Prince William’s hand on the walkabout. Bell and her friend Kisha Cook, both from Nanaimo, wore black decorative fascinators. “I can’t believe it.”

Standing next to them, Lori Hitchcox said she was shaking after her encounter with the prince.

“He asked if I lived in Victoria. I said yes. And he said, ‘I see we’re taking up most of your city,’ ” said Hitchcox, wearing a maple leaf scarf. “I told him I loved his grandmother. He was so sincere. They really are as nice as they look.”

Monique Girard was surprised to be approached by the duchess while holding her six-month-old daughter Scarlett. “She told me that after this small stage, it only gets better,” Girard said. “I told her that she’s beautiful. It was like this goddess in front of me.”

Kate told Girard and Loreen Topping that she wished she had brought her children, particularly Prince George, so that they could enjoy the lights on the legislative buildings.

Dayna Mottishaw and her friend Courtney Simcoff were decked out in pearls, fascinators and tea cups.

“We’re both moms of young kids so it’s not easy to get out and do something like this,” said Mottishaw. It panned out. They saw the royal couple up close and shook the prince’s hand. “He really looks you in the eye.”

Mottishaw said it was a once in a lifetime chance to see the royals, then quipped, “Although I am off to see the Royals tonight. They’re playing Prince George,” she said, referring to the local hockey game.

After the one-hour ceremony, the duke and duchess returned to Government House, where they had private meetings with the prime minister and Governor General. They are scheduled to leave Victoria today at 10 a.m. by seaplane for a day of events in Vancouver.

Surrey, BC. Surrey Libraries is pleased to launch its Strategic Plan for 2016 – 2018. The Library Board presented the Plan to Mayor and Council at the Council meeting on May 2. The Plan is a culmination of a yearlong process incorporating community, stakeholder and staff input.

“Libraries continue to serve an important role in the community. Long respected in their traditional roles, libraries are now emerging as dynamic platforms, offering improved access to technology and sparking innovation that will, in turn, help to transform the communities they serve,” said Library Board Chair Upkar Tatlay. “The library is at the forefront of addressing the digital literacy needs of our residents,  ensuring that everyone has access to technology and the required technical skills that are driving change in our schools, workplaces and homes. “

“Board and staff alike are proud of the accomplishments of the past few years,” says Melanie Houlden, Chief Librarian.  “We have seen a gradual shift in services as people adopt electronic formats such as e-books.  With a focus on excellent service, we will engage with the community to inspire creativity and innovation.”

Some key initiatives planned for the future include:

A brand new website to engage better with Surrey residents

  • An action plan for serving children and families
  • Expanded software and tools to support digital learning

 

The full plan can be viewed at the library website www.surreylibraries.ca

Mice that were given a vitamin lived longer and were able to regenerate their organs as if they were young again.

By Zoe Demarco

Scientists say that they have found evidence that an already-celebrated vitamin can stop the aging process of organs in mice. It could also have the potential to treat degenerative diseases in humans.

Called nicotinamide riboside (NR for short), the vitamin was given to elderly mice. Compared to their non-vitamin taking counterparts, the mice were better able to regenerate their muscles and organs. They also lived longer.

The study was published Thursday in the journal Science.

As humans, mice, and other mammals age, our muscles and organs are less able to regenerate and repair themselves when they’re damaged. This leads to many common age-related disorders, according to Medical Xpress.

Gavin Young/Calgary Herald

Gavin Young/Calgary HeraldNicotinamide riboside has also been shown to regenerate brain and skin cells.

The scientists, from Switzerland, Brazil, and the University of Ottawa, first looked at how mitochondria change with age. Mitochondria, often called the “powerhouse of the cell,” are the parts that keep it full of energy. The scientists found that the mitochondria’s ability to function properly was important for stem cells — the cells responsible for regeneration — to stay healthy as well.

“We demonstrated that fatigue in stem cells was one of the main causes of poor regeneration or even degeneration in certain tissues or organs,” Hongbo Zhang, one of the authors of the study, told Medical Xpress.

This is where nicotinamide riboside comes in. It’s a precursor to a molecule called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ for short), which helps mitochondria function.

So, basically, nicotinamide riboside helps to form NAD+. NAD+ keeps the mitochondria working. The mitochondria keeps stem cells healthy. And stem cells help our organs to regenerate.

NR is closely related to heart-healthy vitamin B3. Other studies have shown that it has the ability to boost metabolism and has the same regenerative abilities on the brain and skin cells.

“This work could have very important implications in the field of regenerative medicine,” said Johan Auwerx, head of the study. “We are not talking about introducing foreign substances into the body but rather restoring the body’s ability to repair itself with a product that can be taken with food.”

While the study produced no negative side effects in the mice, the regenerative effects apply to all cells, even harmful ones such as those that cause dementia. Further studies are planned, said Medical Xpress.

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This simple pizza-like dish gets a tremendous amount of flavour from onions, which are cooked slowly in a small amount of bacon fat.

SARA MOULTON, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Back in the ’80s and ’90s, I used to work behind the scenes with Julia Child during her appearances on “Good Morning America.” It was my job to prepare the food she would put before the cameras.

Once, when I knew in advance that I couldn’t be there for one of her upcoming appearances, I invited a pal of mine — a culinary professional — to try out for the gig. We prepped the food as usual, and at the end of the day I thought my friend had done a dandy job. Julia flatly disagreed and said she wouldn’t hire her. I was flabbergasted. “Why not?” I asked.

“Because she sliced the onions the wrong way,” Julia replied.

Yikes! I simply hadn’t focused on how my friend sliced the onions. I didn’t think this detail was that important. But all these years later, I realize Julia was right. Exactly how you slice an onion makes a difference. So does how you cook it.

Everyone knows that chopping onions can literally bring tears to your eyes. Here’s why. When an onion’s cells are ruptured, they give off pungent sulfur fumes. The more roughly an onion is treated — such as when it is chopped with a dull knife or pulsed in a food processor — the more fumes it gives off.

There are any number of quaint folk remedies for this problem. Put a piece of bread in your mouth while you’re chopping. Do your chopping near a running faucet. And so on. None of them works.

What does work — at least when you’re chopping up a lot of onions — is wearing onion goggles. Modeled on welder’s goggles, these babies prevent the onion’s fumes from reaching your eyes. But the best everyday tactic is to chop or slice the onion quickly and with a very sharp knife. Chilling the onion for an hour or two ahead of time also is a good idea.

Having managed to blunt an onion’s ability to bring you to tears, let’s turn to the correct way to slice one, a la Julia. Lengthwise, not crosswise, is the way to roll. Cutting an onion in half through the root end and then slicing it from stem to stern stimulates far fewer sulfur fumes. These lengthwise slices also happen to hold together much better than crosscut slices, precisely because you’ve sliced with the grain instead of against it. This is especially important for a dish like onion soup, when you want the slices to maintain their shape.

Finally, we come to how to cook an onion, which affects not just the flavour of the onion, but of the whole dish. If you throw it into a hot pan and quickly saute it over high heat, the onion and the dish it’s added to will be bland. If you do it slowly over low heat, you’ll maximize the onion’s flavour.

All of these tips apply to making my Alsatian onion pie. The French call it tarte flambee. The Germans call it Flammkuchen. It strikes me as more like a pizza than anything else. I tasted it for the first time on a river cruise in France a couple years ago, and I was really knocked out by its combination of simplicity and big flavour. Accompanied by a fresh salad, this treat would make the perfect light supper for the beginning of spring.

ALSATIAN ONION PIE
Start to finish: 1 hour 15 minutes

6 oz bacon, thinly sliced crosswise
4 cups thinly sliced yellow onion
kosher salt and ground black pepper
8 oz creme fraiche
1 large egg yolk
pinch nutmeg
1 1/2-lb ball purchased pizza dough, room temperature
3 oz coarsely grated Gruyere cheese

1. In a large skillet over medium, cook the bacon, stirring, until it starts to brown, 5 to 8 minutes. Transfer the bacon to paper towels to drain and pour off all but 2 tablespoons of the fat from the skillet. Return the skillet to medium heat and add the onions. Cook, covered, stirring occasionally, until very soft, about 10 minutes. Remove the cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden, about another 30 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, then set aside.
2. Heat the oven to 500°F. Arrange one of the oven racks on the oven’s bottom shelf.
3. In a small bowl, stir together the creme fraiche, egg yolk, nutmeg and a pinch each of salt and pepper.
4. Divide the dough into 3 even pieces. On a lightly oiled surface, roll out each piece into a 10-by-12-inch rectangle about 1/8-inch thick. Transfer each to a 15-by-17-inch sheet of kitchen parchment. The dough may shrink and lose its shape. If so, roll it again on the parchment.
5. One at a time, transfer each piece of parchment and dough to a bak sheet (unless your oven can fit 2 sheets on one shelf, you’ll need to bake these one at a time). Spread a third of the creme fraiche mixture over the piece of dough on the baking sheet, then top with a third of the onions and bacon. Sprinkle with a third of the cheese, then bake on the oven’s lower shelf for 10 minutes, or until the crust is crisp. Repeat with remaining dough and toppings. Serve right away.
makes three 10- to 12-inch pizzas

Nutrition information per half pizza: 640 calories; 310 calories from fat (48 per cent of total calories); 35 g fat (16 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 120 mg cholesterol; 1260 mg sodium; 60 g carbohydrate; 4 g fibre; 6 g sugar; 17 g protein.

Louis B. Hobson- Calgary Herald
This year’s Oscar for best documentary short went to Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy’s A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness.

It focused on the plight of an 18-year-old girl in Pakistan who incurred the wrath of her father and uncle when she eloped with a man she loved who was not her family’s choice for her.

As Obaid-Chinoy explained in her acceptance speech, every year more than 1,000 young girls and women fall victim to barbaric religious practices which sanction honour killings.

Moved by the international outcry surrounding Obaid-Chinoy, the president of Pakistan announced he will have his justice ministers look into changing the laws that protect the men from any repercussions especially if it is a family member who dies at their hands.

Watching the Oscars, and especially the win for A Girl in the River, Niru Bhati, the artistic director of Calgary’s Hidden Gems Film Festival, knew she had to find a film about honour killings for Hidden Gem’s March offering.

Bhati also knew that film had to be Avantika Hari’s 2011 award-winning film Land Gold Women, so she called the filmmaker at her home in England to get permission to screen the film on March 20 at 2:30 p.m. in the amphitheatre of the Alberta College of Arts & Design in the building adjacent to the Jubilee Auditorium.

“When we see films about honour killings in Pakistan or India — and there are some very disturbing ones — it’s too easy to dismiss the subject because it’s happening in those countries,” Bhati says.

“The thing about Land Gold Women is that it is set in contemporary Birmingham and the father is not an uneducated man. He teaches at the University of Birmingham.

“It’s only when his very traditional brother arrives from Pakistan that he is drawn back into a cultural mindset that condones punishment for women who disobey their fathers,” says Bhati.

“This man’s great dilemma is whether to risk losing his daughter or all family ties.

“He’s not a monster but what he might do is definitely monstrous.”

Bhati says the film also “looks at how western countries try to punish these cultural crimes in modern courts and that is not always easy.

“It also asks very clearly and effectively what’s honourable about any killing.”

Bhati stresses that Land Gold Women is “not only a timely film but the only one I thought was appropriate for our audiences.”

While she had Hari on the phone, Bhati asked if she could also screen the filmmaker’s short film Hat Day, which had impressed Bhati for its ability to move audiences in such a brief time.

“Anushka was thrilled that I wanted to show Hat Day as short films get so little exposure.”

Tickets are $15 at the door for cash only.

The popular Chai Cafe opens from 1:30 to 2:15 p.m.

Céline Dion's former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million

SOTHEBY’SCéline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million

The most expensive property on the Montreal-area resale market — the former home of Celine Dion — has sold, according to a report. The asking price was $25.5 million.

The castle near Laval had been on sale for more than two years. In 2013, the asking price was a cool $29,655,500 — listed with as many fives as possible because it was the lucky number of Dion and René Angélil. Her husband and manager died one month ago after a long battle with cancer.

Handout

HandoutInformal dining room and family room with magnificent built-ins, with integrated media components and access to the terrace and yard. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.

The French Normand-style chateau is on a private island between Laval and Boisbriand, Ile Gagnon. There are six bedrooms and nine bathrooms.

“Yes, the house is sold, and that’s all I can tell you, out of respect for Ms. Dion,” a Sotheby’s spokesperson told La Presse.

Boudoir with double height ceilings, fireplace with decorative mantle and an elegant staircase leading to a soaking tub. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.

Handout

HandoutCéline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
Handout

HandoutCéline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
SOTHEBY'S

SOTHEBY’SFor the ultimate entertaining experience, a most stunning stone vaulted wine cellar with integrated tasting room seating 10. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
Handout

HandoutLuxurious master bedroom suites with sumptuous ensuite bathrooms, spacious walk-ins closets, Juliette balconies and oversized doors and windows overlooking the water. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutThe formal dining room seats eighteen, with beautiful terrace and water views. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutGrand entry foyer opens onto three levels with magnificent winding staircase and inlayed marble floors. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutThis custom la Cornue kitchen is perfect for entertaining and boasts spectacular water views. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutFabulous wood-panelled library with custom fireplace surround, built-ins, coffered ceiling and gleaming custom wood floors. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
Handout

HandoutLuxurious master bedroom suites with sumptuous ensuite bathrooms, spacious walk-ins closets, Juliette balconies and oversized doors and windows overlooking the water. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
Handout

HandoutThe mansion pool house. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
Handout

HandoutBoudoir with double height ceilings, fireplace with decorative mantle and an elegant staircase leading to a soaking tub. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.