Celebrities

Goodbye, Canada. We’ll be back. That was the promise Saturday from the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

— Image Credit: Ken Sakamoto / Black Press
 by  Staff Writer – Victoria News

The Duke of Cambridge gave a heartfelt thank you to Canadians for welcoming the Royal couple and their children so warmly.

Prince William’s speech came during the final day of the week-long visit to B.C. and Yukon with Kate, Prince George and Princess Charlotte.

“Catherine and I are incredibly grateful to the people of Canada for the warmth and hospitality they have extended to our family over the last week. We have loved our time in British Columbia and Yukon and will never forget the beautiful places we have seen and the many people who have been kind enough to come to welcome us in person.

“We feel very lucky to have been able to introduce George and Charlotte to Canada. This country will play a big part in the lives of our children and we have created such happy memories for our family during this visit.

“Canada is a country of optimism, generosity and unrivalled natural beauty. I hope we have helped all Canadians celebrate what makes this country great. We will see you again soon.”

Well-wishers were enthralled by the sight of the waving children, Prince George and Prince Charlotte, from the floatplane dock before beginning their journey home to Kensington Palace.

Thousands of onlookers cheered and clapped as the royals walked along the floating dock to board their flight.

Prince George, 3, wearing red shorts and a sweater, waved both hands enthusiastically at the spectators. He was greeted by flower boy Daniel Brachman, 11, of Victoria. But the young Prince did not exchange high-fives with Brachman. Prince George also refused to high-five Prime Minister Justin Trudeau last week.

Princess Charlotte, wearing a red sweater and a dress, walked along the dock holding her mother, Kate’s, hand. The family faced the crowd and waved before boarding the float plane.

Prince William and his wife Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge

The Duchess of Cambridge greets a large crowd of admirers during the welcoming ceremony at the B.C. legislature on Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016.   Photograph By DARREN STONE, Times Colonist

Prince William and his wife Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, began their week-long tour of British Columbia and the Yukon in Victoria Saturday with a welcome ceremony that honoured Canadian military service, young people and First Nations in front of a lively crowd of thousands.

“Catherine and I have asked to meet as many people from as many walks of life as we can while we’re here,” he said in a speech at the legislature, where an estimated 25,000 people were in the crowd. “We’re very much looking forward to learning about how Canadians are tackling some of the biggest challenges of the day.”

The prince recalled his visit to B.C. as a teenager in the late 1990s, when he was a heartthrob greeted by screaming girls. “We feel very fortunate to have time to get to really know parts of this country that we did not get to visit in 2011 but of which I have very happy memories as a shy teenager,” he said, pausing and grinning. “A few of you remember it too well, I think.”

At the legislature, the crowd’s biggest screams came at the first sight of the royal couple’s children arriving at 443 Maritime Helicopter Squadron at Victoria International airport, shown on a large screen. The Royal Family arrived 10 minutes ahead of schedule on a military plane carrying Prince William’s seal. They were greeted by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau, Premier Christy Clark and her bowtie-sporting teenage son Hamish, Gov. Gen. David Johnston and his wife Sharon, and Lt. Gov. Judith Guichon.

The Prince William emerged from the plane holding the hand of three-year-old Prince George, dressed in a light blue sweater and shorts. Kate — wearing a blue maple leaf hat by British design house Lock and Co. and the Queen’s maple leaf brooch — carried 16-month-old Princess Charlotte. Prince George appeared more interested in a Sea King helicopter landing at the base than he did in the official receiving line, while Princess Charlotte waved goodbye to the plane.

This was the first of two public appearances the children will make during the visit. The second will be at their departure from Victoria at the downtown seaplane terminal on Oct. 1.

The family left in a motorcade of two dozen vehicles that stopped at Government House, where they will stay for the week, before heading to the legislature. People stood on the side of the highway from the airport to downtown Victoria cheering and taking photos as the royal motorcade passed. Overpasses were packed with waving people. The windows of the car carrying the royals were down so that they could wave back.

Some of the thousands waiting at the legislature lawn had staked out spots before dawn.

“We got here around 6:15 a.m. and a few other ladies were already here,” said Sarah Larson, who drove down from Courtenay with her mother Gloria Zimmer Friday night.

“It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity to see them … I’ve been researching royal stuff all week,” said Larson, who sat on a blanket alongside the red carpet walkway with snacks, travel Boggle and enough crosswords to fill the day. Larson also prepared a bouquet with the Canadian and Union Jack flags and small picture of a friend who died. “She was a major royals fan. She would have loved this.”

Emily Emery and her mother Jill Boudreau drove from Mount Vernon, Washington, for the event. “I admire their work and how they use their celebrity for good. They’re big on children’s health and as a nurse, I admire them,” Emery said.

Patrick Wilson stood for nearly 12 hours at a metal gate along the red carpet to see the royal couple. He said as a First Nations person, from the north Island Kwakiutl First Nation, it is meaningful for him to see the Royal Family’s interest in B.C.’s Indigenous peoples. “I don’t have the words for it but it’s good,” said Wilson, wearing a cedar bark top hat.

The royal couple arrived at the legislature around 5:30 p.m., about a half hour behind schedule.

A solemn ceremony at the legislature cenotaph marked the start of the ceremony, featuring the skirl of bagpipes and a lone bugler.

The cheerful crowd grew silent as Kate and William placed a wreath at the cenotaph. Retired colonel Paul Paone, who was with the Canadian Forces in Afghanistan, was happy to see a new plaque honouring Afghanistan veterans unveiled. “It’s absolutely wonderful,” he said. “It took long enough.”

William and Kate spoke at length with three veterans, including Gordon Quan, who served as a commando in Burma during the Second World War.

Also meeting the royal pair were Afghanistan veterans Cpl. Mireille Poulin and Petty Officer Wayne Clarke. Prince William, who flew helicopters in the Royal Air Force, asked Poulin what kind of helicopters were used in the Royal Canadian Air Force.

The royal couple was welcomed to traditional Lekwungen territory by Esquimalt and Songhees dancers as they walked the red carpet to the stage with the prime minister and his wife, the Governor General and his wife, the lieutenant governor, and the premier and her son. They were met by a line of local politicians, including Mayor Lisa Helps, First Nations chiefs, Victoria MLA Carole James and federal Green Party Leader Elizabeth May.

In his speech, the Governor General noted that the royal couple first came to Canada in 2011 as newlyweds of three months, “and now you’ve come back as a family. We couldn’t be happier for you,” he said. For Canada, the monarchy “represents a family and reminds us that people come first.”

Trudeau got a few laughs when he jested about travelling with kids. “As any parent who has travelled with children knows, it is a whole different experience when you bring your family with you. I want to commend you and thank you for introducing our part of the world to Prince George and Princess Charlotte,” he said.

“Though let me caution you from my own experience, if they’re anything like our kids, getting them back on a plane after a visit to our beautiful West Coast will really be a challenge.”

William and Kate rewarded many of the fans who’d spent hours waiting to see them with greetings as they walked along the red carpet after the ceremony.

“He said he liked my flower,” said Teresa Bell, who shook Prince William’s hand on the walkabout. Bell and her friend Kisha Cook, both from Nanaimo, wore black decorative fascinators. “I can’t believe it.”

Standing next to them, Lori Hitchcox said she was shaking after her encounter with the prince.

“He asked if I lived in Victoria. I said yes. And he said, ‘I see we’re taking up most of your city,’ ” said Hitchcox, wearing a maple leaf scarf. “I told him I loved his grandmother. He was so sincere. They really are as nice as they look.”

Monique Girard was surprised to be approached by the duchess while holding her six-month-old daughter Scarlett. “She told me that after this small stage, it only gets better,” Girard said. “I told her that she’s beautiful. It was like this goddess in front of me.”

Kate told Girard and Loreen Topping that she wished she had brought her children, particularly Prince George, so that they could enjoy the lights on the legislative buildings.

Dayna Mottishaw and her friend Courtney Simcoff were decked out in pearls, fascinators and tea cups.

“We’re both moms of young kids so it’s not easy to get out and do something like this,” said Mottishaw. It panned out. They saw the royal couple up close and shook the prince’s hand. “He really looks you in the eye.”

Mottishaw said it was a once in a lifetime chance to see the royals, then quipped, “Although I am off to see the Royals tonight. They’re playing Prince George,” she said, referring to the local hockey game.

After the one-hour ceremony, the duke and duchess returned to Government House, where they had private meetings with the prime minister and Governor General. They are scheduled to leave Victoria today at 10 a.m. by seaplane for a day of events in Vancouver.

Céline Dion's former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million

SOTHEBY’SCéline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million

The most expensive property on the Montreal-area resale market — the former home of Celine Dion — has sold, according to a report. The asking price was $25.5 million.

The castle near Laval had been on sale for more than two years. In 2013, the asking price was a cool $29,655,500 — listed with as many fives as possible because it was the lucky number of Dion and René Angélil. Her husband and manager died one month ago after a long battle with cancer.

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HandoutInformal dining room and family room with magnificent built-ins, with integrated media components and access to the terrace and yard. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.

The French Normand-style chateau is on a private island between Laval and Boisbriand, Ile Gagnon. There are six bedrooms and nine bathrooms.

“Yes, the house is sold, and that’s all I can tell you, out of respect for Ms. Dion,” a Sotheby’s spokesperson told La Presse.

Boudoir with double height ceilings, fireplace with decorative mantle and an elegant staircase leading to a soaking tub. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.

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HandoutCéline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutCéline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
SOTHEBY'S

SOTHEBY’SFor the ultimate entertaining experience, a most stunning stone vaulted wine cellar with integrated tasting room seating 10. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutLuxurious master bedroom suites with sumptuous ensuite bathrooms, spacious walk-ins closets, Juliette balconies and oversized doors and windows overlooking the water. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutThe formal dining room seats eighteen, with beautiful terrace and water views. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutGrand entry foyer opens onto three levels with magnificent winding staircase and inlayed marble floors. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutThis custom la Cornue kitchen is perfect for entertaining and boasts spectacular water views. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutFabulous wood-panelled library with custom fireplace surround, built-ins, coffered ceiling and gleaming custom wood floors. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
Handout

HandoutLuxurious master bedroom suites with sumptuous ensuite bathrooms, spacious walk-ins closets, Juliette balconies and oversized doors and windows overlooking the water. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutThe mansion pool house. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.
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HandoutBoudoir with double height ceilings, fireplace with decorative mantle and an elegant staircase leading to a soaking tub. Céline Dion’s former home on a private island near Laval sold for $25.5 million.

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Singh, 27, named in Hollywood and entertainment category

CBC News

Toronto YouTube sensation Lilly Singh, a.k.a Superwoman, has hit another career milestone, making it on the Forbes 30 under 30 list.

The 27-year-old Canadian comedian was named in the Hollywood and Entertainment category.

Singh’s Superwoman YouTube channel features her standup act, and has over 7.5 million subscribers.

This isn’t the first time Singh has landed on a Forbes list.

Last year, the comedian made it on the Forbes list of YouTube millionaires.

Toronto’s Lilly Singh makes Forbes 30 Under 30 list. (Rick MatharuThe Canadian Press)

Singh was eighth on the list, earning $2.5 million.

She shared eighth place with prankster Roman Atwood and chef Rosanna Pansino.

Last year, Singh took her act on the road with a North American tour, with a stop in Toronto in June at the Danforth Music Hall.

Two other Toronto personalities have joined Singh on the list. They are musicians Shawn Mendes, 17, and The Weeknd, 25.

 

Dr Sarwan Singh Randhawa, Community Librarian – Supervisor, Muriel Arnason Library, FVRL

 

The legend of Santa Claus can be traced back hundreds of years to a monk named St. Nicholas. It is believed that Nicholas was born sometime around 280 A.D. to a wealthy family in Patara, near Myra in modern-day Turkey. His parents died, and he inherited a considerable sum of money, but he kept none of it. He gave away all of his wealth and traveled the countryside helping the poor and sick.

Nicholas was chosen a bishop by the people of Myra at very young age. But life was not always good for him. He along with many others was thrown into prison for not worshipping himself as a god as declared by the Roman emperor Diocletian. He was released in 313 AD when Diocletian resigned and Constantine came to power. He then returned to his post as Bishop of Myra continuing his good works until his death on December 6, 343.

After Nicholas died, he was canonized as a saint. Much admired for his piety and kindness, he became the subject of many legends. Over the course of many years, Nicholas’s popularity spread and he became known as the protector of children and sailors. His feast day is celebrated on the anniversary of his death, December 6, a holiday in many countries. This was traditionally considered a lucky day to make large purchases or to get married.

Many stories are told of his generosity as he gave his wealth away in the form of gifts to those in need, especially children. Legends tell of him either dropping bags of gold down chimneys or throwing the bags through the windows. One of the best known of the St. Nicholas stories is that he saved three poor sisters from being sold into slavery or prostitution by their father by providing them with a dowry so that they could be married.

By the Renaissance, St. Nicholas was the most popular saint in Europe. Even after the Protestant Reformation, when the veneration of saints began to be discouraged, St. Nicholas maintained a positive reputation, especially in Holland. During the Protestant Reformation, German Protestants depicted the Christ child, “Chriskindl”, as a giver of gifts. This helped merge the association of St. Nick with Christmas. Later, this association with Chriskindl was translated to Santa’s other name: Kris Kringle. In England he came to be called Father Christmas, and in the Netherlands, the saint’s name, Sinter Nikolass, became shortened to Sinter Klaas.

The American version of the Santa Claus figure received its inspiration and its name from the Dutch legend of Sinter Klaas, brought by settlers to New York in the 17th century, and the name evolved into what it is today – Santa Claus. As early as 1773 the name appeared in the American press as “St. A Claus”. A popular author, Washington Irving gave Americans detailed information about the Dutch version of Saint Nicholas in his book “History of New York” published in 1809 under the pseudonym Diedrich Knickerbocker. This Dutch-American Saint Nick achieved his fully Americanized form in 1823 in the poem “A Visit From Saint Nicholas” more commonly known as “The Night Before Christmas” by Clement Clarke. It was further elaborated by illustrator Thomas Nast, who depicted a rotund Santa for Christmas issues of Harper’s magazine from the 1860s to the 1880s.

Finally, from 1931 to 1964, Haddon Sundblom created a new Santa each Christmas for Coca-Cola advertisements that appeared world-wide on the back covers of Post and National Geographic magazines. This is the Santa we know and love today with a red suit trimmed with white fur, leather boots and belt, long white beard and a pack of toys slung onto his back.

In these days, Santa Claus is a symbol of hope, faith and trust. People believe that he is a jolly, happy and really fat (in good sense) guy, who visits on Christmas Eve, entering houses through the chimney to leave presents under the Christmas tree and in the stockings of all good children. In addition, children are taught that Santa rewards the good children and leaves the bad ones empty-handed.

Washington D.C., Nov. 18 (ANI): Val Kilmer might be reprising his role as ‘Iceman’ in ‘Top Gun 2.’

The 55-year-old actor posted a message on his Facebook wall, saying “I just got offered Top Gun 2 – not often you get to say ‘yes’ without reading the script,” Us Weekly reported.

Kilmer also said that an actor should say ‘yes’ when they have an option to work with Tom Cruise, Gene Hackman, and Francis Coppola. However, the actor later clarified that Coppola and Hackman were not involved in the sequel.

Kilmer played the role of `Iceman` in 1986’s Top Gun alongside Cruise, Kelly McGillis, and Anthony Edwards.

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By- Mehak Sabharwal

New Delhi, Nov. 18(ANI): Like many other leading ladies in the tinsel town, Kalki Koechlin also wishes to work with the Khans and when it comes to the traditional loves stories, she would definitely try her hand in one.

When asked about her dream cast, the 31-year-old actress told ANI that she would love to work with the Khans, especially with Shah Rukh Khan because she thinks he is fantastic and charming as well.

Talking about her dream director, the ‘Margarita With a Straw’ star revealed that Vishal Bhardwaj tops her list because she thinks he is a fine blend of both artistic alternatives and commercial cinema.

Kalki, who strongly believes in the Japanese saying, “‘Today better than yesterday worst that tomorrow,” also said that she would like to try her hand in traditional love stories because for her, it’s not about not wanting to do commercial roles, it’s about fitting in and doing something she can pull off convincingly.

Further, when the thespian actress was asked if she would like to wear a director’s hat some day, she joked that she doesn’t have spare money in her pocket.

Kalki will be next seen in Nicholas Kharkongor’s directorial ‘Mantra’ alongside Shiv Pandit and Rajat Kapoor. She will be seen in the character of Rajat’s rebellious daughter, who always wants more from life.

Washington D.C., Nov. 18 (ANI): After Charlie Sheen admitted to being HIV positive, many celebrities have come forward to support his decision to go public with his illness.

Pop star Lady Gaga posted a picture on Instagram, in which the actor is seen talking to Matt Lauer on ‘The Today Show,’ captioning it “#BraveCharlie @btwfoundation, an opportunity for people all over the world to learn about modern HIV prevention, treatments, and emotional intelligence as it relates to the stigma of the virus,” E!Online reports.

Journalist Piers Morgan shared a picture on twitter, in which he is seen interviewing the actor and captioned it, saying “Bravo @charliesheen – that took guts today. Proud to be your mate.”

‘Two and a Half Men’ actress Heather Locklear shared an old picture with the star on Instagram, captioning “My heart hurts. Prayers for Charlie and his family.”

During an interview on ‘The Today Show,’ the 51-year-old actor had admitted that he was HIV positive and said that he was diagnosed four years ago.

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Washington D.C., Nov 18 (ANI): Charlie Sheen’s representatives have denied former girlfriend Bree Olson’s claims that the actor never told her about his HIV diagnosis.

In an interview with Us Weekly, Sheen’s manager, Mark Burg, said that the truth was she wasn’t in Charlie’s life when he was HIV-positive and so, there was no reason to tell her anything.

Mark said that the actor was tested on a number of occasions around that time, but his diagnosis was long after he fired Olson from the ‘Violent Torpedo of Truth/Defeat Is Not an Option tour.’

Olson, who apparently left her career as an adult actor for him, had claimed that the ‘Two and a Half Men’ star never told her he was HIV positive while she was sleeping with him. (ANI)