Mississauga man charged for stealing $12K from donation boxes at local mosques

By David Shum Global News

A 58-year-old man has been charged with multiple counts of theft after $12,000 went missing from six mosques in Mississauga, Ont., earlier this month.

Peel Regional Police said the thefts consisted of money being stolen from donation boxes at six religious faith centres between June 4 and 17.

Police said the suspect would enter the mosques during opening hours and either steal the locked donation boxes or break into them and remove the money.

In two of the cases, the accused managed to enter the mosques after hours and take the cash.

Ashraf Awad of Mississauga was arrested and charged with five counts of theft under $5,000, one count for theft over $5,000, two counts of break and enter and theft, and one count of break and enter instruments.

Anyone with information on this investigation is asked to call investigators at 12 Division Criminal Investigation Bureau at (905) 453–2121, ext. 1233 or Peel Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

Jawahar Singh Padda of Gateway Pizza in Surrey charges with four counts

Surrey: RCMP arrested the owner of Gateway Pizza, Jawahar Singh Padda on November 1st after police was called to Gateway Pizza.  Mr. Padda was taken into custody and later released on $25,000 bail.  Mr. Padda is facing four charges, including pointing a firearm, uttering threats, forcible confinement w/o lawful authority and assault.  Padda is expected to re-appear in front of Judge on November 24th 2016.

Karman Singh Grewal, and Elson Blue Joy charged in Fentanyl and Cocaine bust

By Caley Ramsay

Global News

Two people from British Columbia have been charged following a drug seizure in Grande Prairie earlier this month.

More than one kilogram of cocaine and nearly 150 fentanyl pills were seized from two Grande Prairie homes on Oct. 13.

The seizure came following a month-long investigation by members of the Alberta Law Enforcement Response Teams and Grande Prairie RCMP.

The following items, worth more than $150,000, were seized from the homes:

  • 1 kilogram of cocaine
  • 146 fentanyl pills
  • 155 grams of marijuana
  • 175 millilitres of GHB
  • Two body armour vests
  • $56,120 cash proceeds of crime

“The seizure and the disruption of this criminal group will help to reduce the negative community impact created by the local drug trade,” Supt. Don McKenna with the Grande Prairie RCMP said.

“This seizure highlights the importance of a coordinated provincial effort to stem the movement and sale of controlled substances.”

Karman Singh Grewal, 24, of Langley, B.C. has been charged with two counts of possession for the purpose of trafficking, possession of drugs and possession of proceeds of crime.

Elson Blue Joy, 22, of Kelowna, B.C. has been charged with possession for the purpose of trafficking, possession of drugs, possession of proceeds of crime, possession of stolen property and possession of body armour.

Watch Below: A member of the RCMP Clandestine Lab Enforcement and Response Team demonstrates how fentanyl pills are made, during a conference in Edmonton Thursday.

The number of fentanyl-related deaths in Alberta has drastically increased over the past five years. In 2011, there were six deaths in the province connected to the drug; that number spiked to 274 deaths in 2015.

In the first six months of 2016, 153 people in Alberta died from apparent drug overdoses related to fentanyl.

A body has been found in Langley

Langley: RCMP in Langley is investigating Homicide after a body was found on roadside in Langley.

The Integrated Homicide Team has shut down Robertson Crescent between 240 and 244 Streets after a dismembered body was found early Wednesday morning.

Langley RCMP says the road will remain closed until they have completed their investigation of the area. A passing motorist discovered human remains on the side of the road and called the police.

No details are being provided by police at this time.

Edmonton police make city’s largest methamphetamine bust

By Claire Theobald

Edmonton police made the largest methamphetamine bust in their history during a traffic stop last Wednesday.

“There’s a lot more drugs out there where these came from,” said Insp. Dwayne Lakusta, the Edmonton police officer in charge of the organized crime branch.
Members of the Edmonton Drug and Gang Enforcement (EDGE) unit began tailing a suspected drug operation in Spring and a suspect already known to police.
After observing what was believed to be drug activity, officers pulled over and stopped a vehicle on June 22, seizing three kilograms of cocaine from inside the car.
“The methamphetamine would equate to over 97,000 single dosages sold to users on the street. The cocaine would result in over 23,000 half-gram dosages,” said Lakusta.

Lakusta said had these drugs been sold in bulk, they could have been worth $900,000 to the dealer. However, once those drugs are broken down for sale on the street, these drugs could have fetched as much as $2 million.
While this is the single largest methamphetamine bust in Edmonton history, Lakusta said it isn’t likely to make much of an impact on Edmonton’s larger meth trade, with the illegal drug showing up on city streets “in abundance,” over the past few months.
“We are scratching the surface, but any time we get an opportunity to take this level of dealer out, it does have an impact on that particular group,” said Lakusta. “I would be naive to think that it will have a larger impact on Edmonton.”
The previous record was set after officers seized five kilograms of meth, and Lakusta described the quantity seized Wednesday as “a significant amount of methamphetamine.”
While officers believe the drugs were going to be trafficked, investigators do not know where the drugs came from or where they were ultimately destined to go.
Ho Tran, 47, is now charged with three counts of possession for the purpose of trafficking.
Tran is currently being held in custody and is due to appear in court in Edmonton on Thursday.

RCMP investigating another shooting in Surrey

Surrey RCMP are investigating after shots were fired in Newton Monday night.

Mounties were called to the 12800-block of 60 Avenue in Surrey at around 8 p.m. Officers found evidence of gunfire in the area. There were no reported injuries.

RCMP say eyewitnesses reported two vehicles leaving the scene soon after shots rang out. Descriptions of the vehicles have not yet been confirmed.

Traffic was closed around 128 Street and 60 Avenue for a few hours while police examined the site for evidence and interviewed witnesses.

This is the most recent case of gun violence in Surrey, which this year had recorded 39 shots-fired incidents by mid-May.

Anyone with information is asked to contact RCMP at 604-599-0502 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

Toronto taxi drivers charged in alleged scam involving debit cards

TORONTO — Two Toronto cab drivers are facing a total of 23 charges after allegedly taking part in a debit card fraud scheme.

Toronto police say the two men would take a customer’s debit card while it was being used to pay a fare, then switch it with a card that looked like it came from the same financial institution.

 

Police say they’ve been investigating the scheme since last fall and believe there may be other victims.

Muhammad Tariq, 26, and 25-year-old Ahmed Dogar are each facing multiple charges including counts of fraud and forgery.

The men are due to appear in court next month.

The Canadian Press

IHIT investigating suspicious death after body of 34-year-old missing man found

Metro Vancouver’s Integrated Homicide Investigation Team is looking into the “suspicious death” of a man found dead in Lynn Creek over the weekend.

The body of Jastinder Athwal, 34, was recovered near the popular North Shore hiking trail on Sunday morning. Police confirmed his identity on Monday afternoon.

“The cause of death remains unknown and the potential of a homicide cannot be ruled out at this time,” said IHIT staff Sgt. Jennifer Pound in a written release.

She said an autopsy would be needed to determine the cause of death.

Investigators say family and friends last saw Athwal on May 19 in the Lynn Valley area. Police opened a missing person investigation and requested the public’s help in finding him.

Investigators are asking anyone with information about Athwal and his disappearance to call the IHIT Tipline at 1-877-551-4448 or, if Crime Stoppers if they prefer to remain anonymous.

CBC News

Texting in cars won’t go away with sneaky police photos

Just like drinking and driving, there are deeper causes that need to be dealt with before we can justify long-range surveillance
By

Over the May long weekend, RCMP in British Columbia were setting up DSLR cameras with super-long lenses to snap drivers mucking with their phones and doing other distracted things. The resulting tickets will be backed up with photographic evidence, goes the thinking, because most of us suspend the belligerence when caught red handed.

With the ability to catch you in the act from over a kilometre away, I admit my initial thought was, “Finally, cops will start busting all those morons I see glued to their phones,” because I swear, every third car I pass has a driver texting. When people see a cop, they drop their phone. But this snoopy thing? Well, now we might be getting somewhere. Right?

Texting drivers are 23 times more likely to be involved in a collision. We know that, and yet, even as people wag a finger at drivers who use their cells, many are still doing it. Hands-free is legal, but not as safe as we pretend. Your eyes may be on the road, but your mind is not. Everywhere, fines and demerits are being raised and yet the problem persists, just like the fact that too many still drink and drive.

Decades of educating and legislating have seen the number of drunks behind the wheel fall, though even that seems to be just hammered down to a stubborn threshold; it seems we will never end a core group determined to drive after drinking, unless they are physically removed from the driver’s seat. Drunks get behind the wheel because drunks make that decision while they’re impaired; it’s why the campaigns all highlight making the decision before you’ve started imbibing, rather than after.

Seatbelt legislation is often used as a model of success for behavioural change. Most of us buckle up, and most of us know that seatbelts work in conjunction with those airbags. Not buckling up may be your idea of going rogue, but car manufacturers can only save you if you use the features as intended. A body repair shop worker I know tells me he can’t believe the condition of some of the cars that come into his shop after a major crash, and that the occupants were not severely injured. He says even a decade ago those same occupants would have been dead. Call me cynical, but I think a lot of those tumbling fatality statistics have far more to do with automotive safety advances than improved driver behaviour.

But cellphones are proving to be their own kind of hell on our roads. Cellphones and their connective counterparts – Twitter, texting, Facebook, email – can be addictive. They ping the same part of your brain that gets ramped up when you gamble or have sex, and give it a hit of dopamine. You’re not imagining that pull you feel when your phone rings, or a message lands. Your brain wants that rush. You’re supposed to enjoy things to feel that chemical release; it’s our hardwired reward system.

The problem arises when we combine these interactive exercises with driving – driving that needs to be not just our primary focus, but our only one. Car manufacturers have loaded a ton of distractions into today’s vehicles, and most have had to dial back what works as you’re rolling along; jamming away at a navigation system at speed is deadly, though so is trying to scroll through a bunch of touchscreens to turn down the heat. Manufacturers have a lot to answer for in their quest to let us entertain ourselves (sometimes to death), but handheld devices are on us, even when mated to the vehicle’s in-house systems.

New Westminster Police seeing person of Interest in ongoing investigation

New Westminster – The NWPD is seeking the public’s assistance to identify an adult South Asian male who is a person of interest in an ongoing police investigation. The incident occurred on December 21st 2015 at approximately 10:15pm after he befriended another male on public transit.

“There is no public safety concern, but we are asking for assistance to identify the male in the photo,” stated Media Relations Officer Acting Sergeant Jeff Scott. “We are not able to discuss the details of the investigation, but we can say that this is not related to any offense that happened on public transportation.”

Anyone who may know the male in the photo is asked to contact Constable Oliveira at 604-525-5411.