Study finds troubling link between use of muscle-building supplements and cancer

BY ABBY PHILLIP, THE WASHINGTON POST

The growth in popularity of dietary supplements has come largely despite a lack of scientific evidence to back up claims that they work.

There are, however, growing questions about their risks.

The latest: A new study, published in the British Journal of Cancer on Monday, found evidence of a troubling connection between men who took muscle-building supplements and their risk of developing testicular cancer.

Genes and family history factor into the likelihood that someone will develop testicular cancer, but those factors alone don’t explain why rates of this form of cancer have increased in the last few decades.

So researchers conducted a survey of almost 900 men from Massachusetts and Connecticut, asking them questions about their habits (supplement use, smokingdrinkingexercise and other factors) and family history of testicular cancer. Among the men surveyed, 356 had been diagnosed with testicular cancer and 513 were not diagnosed with the cancer.

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Researchers found a clear relationship between the use of muscle-building supplements and the risk of developing cancer even after controlling for other factors like race and age. Participants in the control group and the group with cancer had similar levels of education, prevalence of smoking, alcohol drinking and height.

“The observed relationship was strong,” Tongzhang Zheng, who led the study at Yale University, said in a statement. (Zheng is now a professor of epidemiology at Brown University School of Public Health.) “If you used at earlier age, you had a higher risk. If you used them longer, you had a higher risk. If you used multiple types, you had a higher risk.”

In this case, “use” means taking a supplement at least once a week for at least four consecutive weeks.

A representative for the Council for Responsible Nutrition, a leading trade association for the supplement industry, was not immediately available for comment.

Overall, men who used muscle-building supplements increased their risk of developing testicular cancer by 65 percent. Men who used more than one type of muscle building supplement had a 177 percent increase in risk. Men who used the supplements for three years or more had a 156 percent increase in risk. And men who started using supplements at the age of 25 or younger had a 121 percent increase in risk.

“Considering the magnitude of the association and the observed dose-response trends, muscle-building supplements use may be an important and modifiable exposure that could have important scientific and clinical importance for preventing testicular germ cell cancer development if this association is confirmed by future studies,” the authors note in the study.

Critically, the study doesn’t specifically name supplements that were used by the study’s participants but they included 30 different types of powders and pills. Among the major ingredients were creatine, protein, and androstenedione. And the results suggest a relationship between supplement use and cancer, but it don’t prove that the supplements cause cancer.

Additional clinical experiments will need to be conducted in order to confirm the results.

But recent research has raised questions about the potential harm posed by dietary supplements on the lightly regulated market, whose sales reached $13 billion in 2013. Previous research has linked ingredients in performance-enhancing supplements to a substance that caused testicular damage in rats. Another has shown a high prevalence of performance-enhancing supplement use among people diagnosed with testicular cancer.