Dramatic video shows sidewalk sinkhole in China swallowing up five pedestrians

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS AUGUST 27, 2015 11:54 AM

A provincial broadcaster said four people were injured in the Saturday incident in the provincial capital of Harbin.

The surveillance camera video shows pedestrians walking or standing on the sidewalk when it suddenly gave in.

Three people fell straight into the hole, while a woman clung to pipes just underneath the sidewalk. Another person standing on the edge fell sideways into the hole.

Heilongjiang Network Broadcasting Television said the people were probably waiting for a bus because it occurred at a bus stop. The bus sign also was swallowed by the sinkhole, the broadcaster said.

Passers-by pulled the victims from the hole, which was about 3 metres deep, the broadcaster said.

It said four received minor injuries to their feet, legs, arms and shoulders.

It was not immediately clear what caused the sidewalk to collapse.

Indian Government launches Ten Year Multiple Entry Visa for Canadians

10-Year multiple-entry Tourist and Business Visa is being introduced for Canadian nationals with immediate effect, announced Mr. Vishnu Prakash, the Indian High Commission in Ottawa.

“Fulfilling a promise made by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi on his recent historic visit to Canada, the Government of India is now accepting applications for ten year multiple entry visas for Canadians,”  says Minister of National Defence and Minister for Multiculturalism.

Prime Minister Modi made the commitment while joined by Prime Minister Stephen Harper in front of a crowd of over 10,000 Canadians of Indian origin in Toronto in April of this year.

Tourist Visa

 

The Tourist Visa (TV) is meant for visiting India for recreation, sightseeing or meeting friends and relatives, but for no other purpose.

Apparently the Indian government has been angry about some people using their visa to carry out journalist assignments and indulge in other activities without permission.

Requirements:

* Duly completed visa application form.

* Two recent passport size (51mm x 51mm) colour photos showing full frontal face against a white background. One photo needs to be pasted on the application form and other enclosed separately.

* Passport with minimum of six months’ validity and at least two blank pages.

* Proof of address.

* For persons who have held an Indian passport in past – proof of renunciation of Indian citizenship and immigration status at time of arrival in Canada.

* Fees: $202 plus processing fee of BLS International Services Canada Inc.

 

Business Visa

 

The Business Visa (BV) is meant for visiting India for business and trade purposes.

Requirements:

* Duly completed Business Information Sheet.

* A letter of request from the applicant’s company / organization in Canada.

* An invitation letter from Indian company indicating the nature of applicant’s business with India, probable duration of stay, the places and firms to be visited in India.

* Fees: $308 plus processing fee of BLS International Services Canada Inc.

* Requirements as given above for Tourist Visa.

* More details about BV are available at https://www.mha.nic.in/pdfs/work_visa_faq.pdf

 

Important Information and Highlights

 

* The period of continuous stay during each visit will not exceed 180 days.

* Registration with concerned FRRO / FRO will be required for continuous stay exceeding 180 days.

* It is advisable to apply for visa at least 15 days before your intended date of travel.

* Online Visa application form is available on websitehttp://indianvisaonline.gov.in/visa/

* Submit the printout of the duly completed and signed online visa forms along with supporting documents at one of the offices of the Indian High Commission’s outsourcing agents, BLS International. Their office addresses, timings phone numbers and e-mail address can be found at http://www.blsindia-canada.com/contactus.php

* The duration and number of entries of the visa issued is completely at the discretion of Indian High Commission / Consulates.

* You may also visit High Commission of India, Ottawa’s website atwww.hciottawa.ca, Consulate General of India, Toronto’s website atwww.cgitoronto.ca and Consulate General of India, Vancouver’s website atwww.cgivancouver.org or the outsourcing agency M/s BLS International Services Canada Inc. at their website www.blsindia-canada.com for details.

 

Taxi Driver Arminder Singh Jailed Over Fatal Crash In Australia

MELBOURNE  – A 30-year-old Indian-origin taxi driver in Australia has been sentenced two years in prison, suspended after four months, on charges of dangerously operating a vehicle that caused the death of a man last year.

Arminder Singh was sentenced on Friday after he pleaded guilty to the charges.

“It was a short-lived mistake with catastrophic consequences,” judge Brian Devereaux told Singh, as he sentenced him in Brisbane district court recently.

Dean Thomasson, 47, was on his way home to Cornubia where he lived with his parents when he was hit by the cab driven by Singh late one July night last year.

Dean later died from his fatal injuries.

“He was the love of our lives,” Helen Thomasson, mother of Dean who was deaf from a young age, said.

“When we got the phone call to come and identify him, 12 months ago today, it broke our hearts,” she said.

The court heard that Singh, who was now an Australian citizen, has a wife and a baby in India.

It was told that his jail term would affect the family as there was no social security in India.

Devereaux sentenced him to two years, suspended after four months, and banned him from driving for nine months.

All kinds of Canadians neglect their feet, but that can be a life-altering decision for people with diabetes.

The chances of having a toe or foot amputated due to an infected wound are about 20 times higher for a diabetic. And a lower limb amputation often starts a spiral of decline: up to two-thirds of patients die within a year.

“There’s a high risk of death following amputation. In fact, the mortality rate is greater than some cancers,” explains Dr. Jan Hux, chief science officer for the Canadian Diabetes Association.

That organization is on a mission to remind the growing number of people with diabetes to baby their feet like never before. Thousands of Canadians are expected to lose their toes or feet each year despite advances in care that have brought the rate of amputations down among diabetics. That’s because the sheer number of people diagnosed is forecast to rise to 4.2 million by 2020.

There were 4,400 diabetes-related amputations across the country in 2008, the last year for which reliable data are available. That marked a small increase from 4,020 10 years earlier, according to the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System.

The road to the operating room starts with foot numbness called diabetic neuropathy.

“Pain is an important defence mechanism. If you or I had a pebble in our shoe, we wouldn’t walk three steps without taking it out. The person with diabetes will walk on it all day,” says Hux.

That creates a sore that remains unnoticed because nerves to their feet have been damaged due tohigh blood sugar and a lack of oxygen from poor blood flow. That same lack of circulation — again coupled with high blood sugar — creates the perfect environment for infections to grow.

“They’re more likely to get an injury and they’re less likely to be able to heal it,” says Hux. That’s why diabetes accounts for up to 70 per cent of all non-traumatic limb amputations.

Wayne Sidsworth, a 56-year-old management consultant from Hamilton, Ont., watched the process claim his foot in a matter of days. He had been diagnosed at 37 with type 1 diabetes and thought he had it under control. It turned out that a blockage in the main artery of his leg — likely formed before he knew he had diabetes — couldn’t be repaired through several surgeries.

He knew then his lower leg would have to come off, but was unprepared to watch a tiny cut on the sole of his foot transform from a dime-sized sore to a gangrenous limb over the course of a weekend. A surgeon removed it in an emergency operation on the Monday morning.

“I woke up at 9 o’clock without my leg,” Sidsworth recounts. “I got through that part OK. The hard part was rehabilitation, learning how to walk again.”

His advice to others? Get diagnosed. Sidsworth believes he could have avoided some of the damage by getting his blood sugar down from its sky-high levels earlier.

Hux agrees, but goes further. The CDA says 57 per cent of diabetics don’t follow doctors’ orders because they can’t afford the medical supplies to monitor their blood sugar levels or the medications that can help. As a result, only half of Canadians with type 2 diabetes have their blood glucose levels under control and therefore run the risk of slow-healing wounds along with heart diseasekidney damage and blindness. That’s why the CDA endorses proposals for a national Pharmacare program to make sure low- and middle-income patients receive proper care.

“If people can manage their blood sugars well and have the resources they need to do that, then the damage to the nerves won’t happen. This cascade can be avoided where a barefoot walk in the park leads to a below-the-knee amputation,” says Hux.

Sole searching

Foot care advice from the Canadian Diabetes Association:

  • Wear shoes that fit with clean socks.
  • Avoid going barefoot — even in the house — or wearing flip-flops or footwear that presses in one spot.
  • Check your feet daily for cuts, sores and cracks, using a hand mirror to see the bottoms if needed.
  • Don’t use over-the-counter corn and wart removers.
  • Seek help if you notice a wound. Foot specialists can offer advice for protecting a sore.
  • The CDA’s Clothesline program is collecting gently used shoes to distribute to homeless shelters across Canada. For more information call 1-800-505-5525 or download the Clothesline app to find the nearest drop box.

Diabetes in brief

Blood sugar. The key factor in all diabetes is the body’s inability to process sugar. It can be caused by a lack of insulin — the hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate it — or insulin resistance, which is a key indicator of pre-diabetes. Regular finger-prick blood tests throughout the day show diabetics their blood sugar levels so they make changes in food intake, exercise or medication to keep them stable. Uncontrolled high blood sugar causes damage throughout the body. Prolonged high or low blood sugar can cause a diabetic coma.

Type 1 diabetes. Also known as juvenile diabetes, the disease is often diagnosed in children and teens and typically require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar. It accounts for about 10 per cent of cases and is a serious chronic illness that requires a lifetime of attention.

Type 2 diabetes. This condition is a fast-growing plague in North America that now makes up 90 per cent of all diabetes. It can be brought on by carrying extra weight, a lack of exercise and poor diet. It can sometimes be controlled by lifestyle changes. Damage to the body accumulates the longer it goes uncontrolled.

The epidemic. In 2000, 1.3 million Canadians had diabetes. Ten years later that number more than doubled to 2.7 million. It affects every sphere of society, but has hit First Nations particularly hard, with prevalence about 40-per-cent higher than the rest of Canada.

Sources: Canadian Diabetes Association, National Diabetes Surveillance System

Vancouver Sun

Diabetics face thousands of amputations each year

ERIN ELLIS, VANCOUVER SUN

All kinds of Canadians neglect their feet, but that can be a life-altering decision for people with diabetes.

The chances of having a toe or foot amputated due to an infected wound are about 20 times higher for a diabetic. And a lower limb amputation often starts a spiral of decline: up to two-thirds of patients die within a year.

“There’s a high risk of death following amputation. In fact, the mortality rate is greater than some cancers,” explains Dr. Jan Hux, chief science officer for the Canadian Diabetes Association.

That organization is on a mission to remind the growing number of people with diabetes to baby their feet like never before. Thousands of Canadians are expected to lose their toes or feet each year despite advances in care that have brought the rate of amputations down among diabetics. That’s because the sheer number of people diagnosed is forecast to rise to 4.2 million by 2020.

There were 4,400 diabetes-related amputations across the country in 2008, the last year for which reliable data are available. That marked a small increase from 4,020 10 years earlier, according to the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System.

The road to the operating room starts with foot numbness called diabetic neuropathy.

“Pain is an important defence mechanism. If you or I had a pebble in our shoe, we wouldn’t walk three steps without taking it out. The person with diabetes will walk on it all day,” says Hux.

That creates a sore that remains unnoticed because nerves to their feet have been damaged due to high blood sugar and a lack of oxygen from poor blood flow. That same lack of circulation — again coupled with high blood sugar — creates the perfect environment for infections to grow.

“They’re more likely to get an injury and they’re less likely to be able to heal it,” says Hux. That’s why diabetes accounts for up to 70 per cent of all non-traumatic limb amputations.

Wayne Sidsworth, a 56-year-old management consultant from Hamilton, Ont., watched the process claim his foot in a matter of days. He had been diagnosed at 37 with type 1 diabetes and thought he had it under control. It turned out that a blockage in the main artery of his leg — likely formed before he knew he had diabetes — couldn’t be repaired through several surgeries.

He knew then his lower leg would have to come off, but was unprepared to watch a tiny cut on the sole of his foot transform from a dime-sized sore to a gangrenous limb over the course of a weekend. A surgeon removed it in an emergency operation on the Monday morning.

“I woke up at 9 o’clock without my leg,” Sidsworth recounts. “I got through that part OK. The hard part was rehabilitation, learning how to walk again.”

His advice to others? Get diagnosed. Sidsworth believes he could have avoided some of the damage by getting his blood sugar down from its sky-high levels earlier.

Hux agrees, but goes further. The CDA says 57 per cent of diabetics don’t follow doctors’ orders because they can’t afford the medical supplies to monitor their blood sugar levels or the medications that can help. As a result, only half of Canadians with type 2 diabetes have their blood glucose levels under control and therefore run the risk of slow-healing wounds along with heart diseasekidney damage and blindness. That’s why the CDA endorses proposals for a national Pharmacare program to make sure low- and middle-income patients receive proper care.

“If people can manage their blood sugars well and have the resources they need to do that, then the damage to the nerves won’t happen. This cascade can be avoided where a barefoot walk in the park leads to a below-the-knee amputation,” says Hux.

Sole searching

Foot care advice from the Canadian Diabetes Association:

  • Wear shoes that fit with clean socks.
  • Avoid going barefoot — even in the house — or wearing flip-flops or footwear that presses in one spot.
  • Check your feet daily for cuts, sores and cracks, using a hand mirror to see the bottoms if needed.
  • Don’t use over-the-counter corn and wart removers.
  • Seek help if you notice a wound. Foot specialists can offer advice for protecting a sore.
  • The CDA’s Clothesline program is collecting gently used shoes to distribute to homeless shelters across Canada. For more information call 1-800-505-5525 or download the Clothesline app to find the nearest drop box.

Diabetes in brief

Blood sugar. The key factor in all diabetes is the body’s inability to process sugar. It can be caused by a lack of insulin — the hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate it — or insulin resistance, which is a key indicator of pre-diabetes. Regular finger-prick blood tests throughout the day show diabetics their blood sugar levels so they make changes in food intake, exercise or medication to keep them stable. Uncontrolled high blood sugar causes damage throughout the body. Prolonged high or low blood sugar can cause a diabetic coma.

Type 1 diabetes. Also known as juvenile diabetes, the disease is often diagnosed in children and teens and typically require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar. It accounts for about 10 per cent of cases and is a serious chronic illness that requires a lifetime of attention.

Type 2 diabetes. This condition is a fast-growing plague in North America that now makes up 90 per cent of all diabetes. It can be brought on by carrying extra weight, a lack of exercise and poor diet. It can sometimes be controlled by lifestyle changes. Damage to the body accumulates the longer it goes uncontrolled.

The epidemic. In 2000, 1.3 million Canadians had diabetes. Ten years later that number more than doubled to 2.7 million. It affects every sphere of society, but has hit First Nations particularly hard, with prevalence about 40-per-cent higher than the rest of Canada.

Sources: Canadian Diabetes Association, National Diabetes Surveillance System

Indo-Canadian woman charged for pretending to be nurse, giving Botox injections

Shiva Ashkani, 30, of Brampton, was arrested on August 23 and charged with two counts of criminal negligence causing bodily harm.

By  Riannon Westall

Toronto police have charged a woman for allegedly fraudulently portraying herself as a nurse and giving Botox injections.

According to police, the woman used Kijiji on July 7 and possibly other websites in the GTA to attract clients.

She allegedly met the clients at their home, business or a hotel and was paid thousands of dollars in cash for the service.

Most recently, police say she was providing injection services in a business in the Kipling Ave. and Queensway area.

Police say it’s not clear if the injected substances were Botox or if the medication was stored safely.

Two victims have sustained adverse reactions and possible long-term damaging effects from the procedure.

Shiva Ashkani, 30, of Brampton, was arrested on August 23 and charged with two counts of criminal negligence causing bodily harm.

She appeared in court on August 24.

Police believe there may be other victims and are urging anyone who has received this type of treatment from the accused to seek medical care.

Toronto seniors falling prey to ‘distraction theft’ cons, police warn

Police say that thieves are targeting senior citizens who speak little to no English in a series of ‘distraction thefts’

Thieves are preying on seniors, particularly those who speak little English, Toronto police are warning.

Police report four “distraction thefts” with similar tactics this month alone, between Aug. 17 to 21.

Each time, police say, a woman approaches a senior citizen and asks for directions. The woman distracts her victims by giving them worthless jewelry while stealing expensive jewelry, such as rings and necklaces. Before the victims realize their jewelry is missing, the fraud artist is driven away by a male suspect.

Police are urging the public to be on their guard against these ploys and report any suspicious behaviour to police.

To help alert the community, Crime Stoppers has released a series of YouTube videos in English, Portuguese, and Italian.

Police believe there may be other victims.

Crime Stoppers’ reenactment of a series of ‘distraction thefts’ targeting seniors in the GTA. Videos have been produced in English, Portuguese and Italian.

This isn’t the first time a string of distraction thefts have hit Toronto. In 2014, a Scarborough widow lost irreplaceable jewelry including her wedding ring to a ‘hugging’ distraction thief.

Police also dismantled an international organized crime ring responsible for a series of distraction thefts across southern Ontario and Quebec in 2012.

Indian-American man donates $1.5 mn for Sikh studies

New York: An Indian-American cardiologist has donated $1.5 million to the University of California-Irvine to create a Chair for Sikh studies within the school, media reported on Tuesday.
Harvinder Sahota donated the money to the university that will now teach Sikh studies as a regular course. The department will be named after Sahota’s mother, Bibi Dhan Kaur Sahota, India West reported.

“My mother taught me never to degrade anyone and respect everyone,” Sahota was quoted as saying. “I still abide by the lessons she taught me as a child. I wanted to honour my mother for the woman she was and the man she helped me turn out to be,” he said.
Classes in the department are expected to begin in September, 2016

Manasvi Noel is Miss India-Canada 2015

TORONTO: Manasvi Noel of Mississauga City has been crowned Miss India-Canada 2015 at the 25th edition of the annual beauty pageant organised here, a media report said.

During a night full of “entertainment, prestige and glamour all rolled up into one”, the Dubai-born Noel won the esteemed title, the final top contenders for which included Sharon Philipose, Kajill Aujila, Tanpreet Parmar and Priya Sharma, Canada-based the VOICE reported on Tuesday.
Sharon Philipose was adjudged the first runner-up, while Kajill Aujila was the first runner-up of the contest held during the weekend at the International Plaza Hotel here. This year marked the silver jubilee of the beauty pageant.

Organisers Sanjay Agnihotri and Gautam Sharma also presented the Special Achievement Award to Bollywood actress Preity Zinta for her contribution to Indian and international cinema.
Noel, a graduate from CIMT College’s Etobicoke School of the Arts in drama and acting, is currently studying media communications at Toronto’s Humber College.
She plans to have her own academy for freestyle dancing in which students can learn different Indian and traditional dance forms.

Surrey trucker Dhillon faces multiple charges after U.S. crash kills woman

BY JENNIFER SALTMAN-The Province

Surrey -A Surrey, B.C., truck driver has been charged in connection with a fiery crash that killed one person and injured numerous others on an Ohio highway last month.

Rahmatkarn Singh Dhillon, 24, is charged with aggravated vehicular homicide, aggravated vehicular assault and a traffic violation.

On the afternoon of July 31, Ohio State Highway Patrol responded to a six-vehicle crash on Interstate 76 (also called the Ohio Turnpike) in Austintown Township.

According to a police news release, all vehicles involved were travelling west on the turnpike when the crash happened. Three vehicles in the left lane had slowed and two in the right had stopped due to a lane closure, but a Volvo tractor-trailer unit driven by Dhillon apparently failed to stop and drove down the middle of both lanes, striking three vehicles — one of which hit a fourth — and then plowing into a Dodge Caravan.

The Caravan, which had two adults and two children inside, was pinned against the right side bridge wall by the trailer and caught fire. The trailer also caught fire.

According to reports, bystanders helped remove the driver of the minivan, Michael Gardner, and his children from the vehicle. His wife, 44-year-old Stacy Gardner, was trapped in the rear of the van and died at the scene.

Eight people were injured, including Michael Gardner and his children. Dhillon and two others were uninjured.

On Aug. 3, bond for Dhillon was set at $150,000 cash or surety. According to court records, that bond has not yet been posted.

The case has been bound over to the court of common pleas in Mahoning County, Ohio, to await the action of the grand jury.

According to Facebook, Dhillon received his Class 1 driver’s licence in January.

A person named Rahmatkarn Dhillon who is also 24 years old has had three violation tickets in the past two years, according to online court records.

On April 6, 2013, he was issued a ticket in Richmond for failing to wear or improperly wearing a seatbelt.

He was also ticketed in September 2014 for speeding and passing on the right in Hope.