‘Not Our President’: Protests Spread After Donald Trump’s Election

The demonstrations, fueled by social media, continued into the early hours of Thursday. The crowds swelled as the night went on but remained mostly peaceful.

Protests were reported in cities as diverse as Dallas and Oakland and included marches in Boston; Chicago; Portland, Ore.; Seattle and Washington and at college campuses in California, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.

In Oakland alone, the Police Department said, the crowd grew from about 3,000 people at 7 p.m. to 6,000 an hour later. The situation grew tense late Wednesday, with SFGate.com reporting that a group of protesters had started small fires in the street and broken windows. Police officers in riot gear were called in, and at least one officer was injured, according to other local news reports.

It was the second night of protests there, following unruly demonstrations that led to property damage and left at least one person injured shortly after Mr. Trump’s election was announced.

The protests on Wednesday came just hours after Hillary Clinton, in her concession speech, asked supporters to give Mr. Trump a “chance to lead.”

One of the biggest demonstrations was in Los Angeles, where protesters burned a Trump effigy at City Hall and shut down a section of Highway 101. Law enforcement officials were called out to disperse the hundreds of people who swarmed across the multilane freeway.

In New York, crowds converged at Trump Tower, on Fifth Avenue at 56th Street in Midtown Manhattan, where the president-elect lives.

They chanted “Not our president” and “New York hates Trump” and carried signs that said, among other things, “Dump Trump.” Restaurant workers in their uniforms briefly left their posts to cheer on the demonstrators.

The demonstrations forced streets to be closed, snarled traffic and drew a large police presence. They started in separate waves from Union Square and Columbus Circle and snaked their way through Midtown.

Loaded dump trucks lined Fifth Avenue for two blocks outside Trump Tower as a form of protection.

Emanuel Perez, 25, of the Bronx, who works at a restaurant in Manhattan and grew up in Guerrero, Mexico, was among the many Latinos in the crowd.

“I came here because people came out to protest the racism that he’s promoting,” he said in Spanish, referring to Mr. Trump. “I’m not scared for myself personally. What I’m worried about is how many children are going to be separated from their families. It will not be just one. It will be thousands of families.”

Protesters with umbrellas beat a piñata of Mr. Trump, which quickly lost a leg, outside the building.

The Police Department said on Wednesday night that 15 protesters had been arrested.

Bianca Rivera, 25, of East Harlem, described Mr. Trump’s election as something that was “not supposed to happen.”

“We’re living in a country that’s supposed to be united, a melting pot,” she said. “It’s exposing all these underground racists and sexists.”

After Mr. Trump’s victory speech, more than 2,000 students at the University of California, Los Angeles, marched through the streets of the campus’s Westwood neighborhood.

There were similar protests at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles; University of California campuses in Berkeley, San Diego and Santa Barbara; Temple University, in Philadelphia; and the University of Massachusetts.

High school students also walked out of classes in protest in several cities.

As U.C.L.A. students made their way to classes on Wednesday, they talked about how to make sense of an outcome that had seemed impossible a day earlier.

“I’m more than a little nervous about the future,” said Blanca Torres, a sophomore anthropology major. “We all want to have conversations with each other, to figure out how to move forward. There’s a whole new reality out there for us now.”

Chuy Fernandez, a fifth-year economics student, said he was eager to air his unease with his peers.

“I’m feeling sad with this huge sense of uncertainty,” Mr. Fernandez said. The son of a Mexican immigrant, he said it was difficult not to take the outcome personally.

“We’re all just kind of waiting for a ticking time bomb, like looking around and thinking who will be deported,” he said. “That’s the exact opposite of what most of us thought would happen.”

On Facebook, a page titled “Not My President” called for protesters to gather on Inauguration Day, Jan. 20, in the nation’s capital.

“We refuse to recognize Donald Trump as the president of the United States, and refuse to take orders from a government that puts bigots into power,” the organizers wrote.

“We have to make it clear to the public that we did not choose this man for office and that we won’t stand for his ideologies.”untitled-2

New York Times

Golden’s Sikh heritage recognized on new Stop of Interest sign

A new Stop of Interest sign was unveiled in Golden today, recognizing the community’s early Sikh pioneers and the role they played in Golden’s history.

“This new Stop of Interest recognizes the important contributions early Sikh settlers made in Golden and throughout the Interior of B.C.,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Todd Stone. “This is a good example of the Stop of Interest signs we want to add across the province, to tell the stories of how B.C. was shaped through the contributions of many different ethnicities and cultures.”

“We acknowledge the Gurdwara in Golden as the first in B.C., and quite likely the first in North America,” said Pyara Lotay, on behalf of the local Sikh community. “We thank the B.C. government for recognizing Golden’s Sikh pioneers and their place of worship with this Stop of Interest.”

The sign recognizing Golden’s Sikhs was originally a small local area history sign located next to the ‘Golden’ Stop of Interest sign at the viewpoint off Golden View Road. The new sign will replace the ‘Golden’ Stop of Interest sign, and the refurbished ‘Golden’ sign will be relocated to a site to be selected in consultation with the Town of Golden.

“The story of our community’s Sikh pioneers is one of hard work and determination,” said Golden mayor Ron Oszust. “This Stop of Interest means a lot to our present-day Sikh residents, and highlights an important chapter in the rich history of our region, of which we’re all proud.”

B.C.’s Stop of Interest signs were first installed in 1958 to commemorate the Colony of B.C.’s centenary and recognize significant historical places, people and events. The ministry is refurbishing existing signs in need of repair and updating language where necessary.

In addition, the Province is adding up to 75 new Stop of Interest signs. British Columbians are invited to submit ideas for new Stop of Interest signs and share interesting stories that could be told to people travelling B.C.’s highways. Submissions will be accepted through Jan. 31, 2017.

The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure will install the majority of the new Stop of Interest signs in late spring/early summer 2017.

A new Stop of Interest sign was unveiled in Golden today, recognizing the community’s early Sikh pioneers and the role they played in Golden’s history. BC Transportation and Infrastructure (facebook.com)
A new Stop of Interest sign was unveiled in Golden today, recognizing the community’s early Sikh pioneers and the role they played in Golden’s history. BC Transportation and Infrastructure (facebook.com)

Golden’s Sikh heritage recognized on new Stop of Interest sign

GOLDEN – A new Stop of Interest sign was unveiled in Golden today, recognizing the community’s early Sikh pioneers and the role they played in Golden’s history.

“This new Stop of Interest recognizes the important contributions early Sikh settlers made in Golden and throughout the Interior of B.C.,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Todd Stone. “This is a good example of the Stop of Interest signs we want to add across the province, to tell the stories of how B.C. was shaped through the contributions of many different ethnicities and cultures.”

“We acknowledge the Gurdwara in Golden as the first in B.C., and quite likely the first in North America,” said Pyara Lotay, on behalf of the local Sikh community. “We thank the B.C. government for recognizing Golden’s Sikh pioneers and their place of worship with this Stop of Interest.”

The sign recognizing Golden’s Sikhs was originally a small local area history sign located next to the ‘Golden’ Stop of Interest sign at the viewpoint off Golden View Road. The new sign will replace the ‘Golden’ Stop of Interest sign, and the refurbished ‘Golden’ sign will be relocated to a site to be selected in consultation with the Town of Golden.

“The story of our community’s Sikh pioneers is one of hard work and determination,” said Golden mayor Ron Oszust. ” This Stop of Interest means a lot to our present-day Sikh residents, and highlights an important chapter in the rich history of our region, of which we’re all proud.”

B.C.’s Stop of Interest signs were first installed in 1958 to commemorate the Colony of B.C.’s centenary and recognize significant historical places, people and events. The ministry is refurbishing existing signs in need of repair and updating language where necessary.

In addition, the Province is adding up to 75 new Stop of Interest signs. British Columbians are invited to submit ideas for new Stop of Interest signs and share interesting stories that could be told to people travelling B.C.’s highways.

Submissions will be accepted through Jan. 31, 2017. The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure will install the majority of the new Stop of Interest signs in late spring/early summer 2017.

Investing in improving health care for patients in B.C.

VANCOUVER – The Honourable Jane Philpott, Canada’s Minister of Health, and Terry Lake, British Columbia’s Minister of Health announced today a major investment in research that will strive to improve patient care for those living in British Columbia.

The Government of Canada and the Government of British Columbia announced a combined $80 million in funding and in-kind contributions towards a new British Columbia Support Unit for People and Patient-Oriented Research and Trials (BC SUPPORT).

BC SUPPORT Unit (the Unit) is a multidisciplinary cluster of specialized personnel in the areas of research, policy, and patient care, who will engage patients to identify their needs and set priorities for research.

“I strongly believe that innovation is essential to improving health care. Through initiatives such as Canada’s Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research, we are promoting innovation, fostering collaboration, and helping ensure that we address the health care needs of Canadians,” said Jane Philpott, Federal Minister of Health.

It is expected to increase patient-oriented research throughout the province and help improve health-care services for British Columbians.

BC SUPPORT Unit will collaborate with its counterparts in other provinces and territories to create a pan-Canadian platform for supporting patient-oriented research through the sharing of information and best practices.

Together with its partners, the BC SUPPORT Unit will provide services for researchers, patients, health-care providers, and health system decision-makers. The BC SUPPORT Unit was developed under Canada’s Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR), with support from the Governments of Canada and British Columbia, and provincial partners.

Golden’s Sikh heritage recognized on new Stop of Interest sign

GOLDEN – A new Stop of Interest sign was unveiled in Golden today, recognizing the community’s early Sikh pioneers and the role they played in Golden’s history.

“This new Stop of Interest recognizes the important contributions early Sikh settlers made in Golden and throughout the Interior of B.C.,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Todd Stone. “This is a good example of the Stop of Interest signs we want to add across the province, to tell the stories of how B.C. was shaped through the contributions of many different ethnicities and cultures.”

“We acknowledge the Gurdwara in Golden as the first in B.C., and quite likely the first in North America,” said Pyara Lotay, on behalf of the local Sikh community. “We thank the B.C. government for recognizing Golden’s Sikh pioneers and their place of worship with this Stop of Interest.”

The sign recognizing Golden’s Sikhs was originally a small local area history sign located next to the ‘Golden’ Stop of Interest sign at the viewpoint off Golden View Road. The new sign will replace the ‘Golden’ Stop of Interest sign, and the refurbished ‘Golden’ sign will be relocated to a site to be selected in consultation with the Town of Golden.

“The story of our community’s Sikh pioneers is one of hard work and determination,” said Golden mayor Ron Oszust. “This Stop of Interest means a lot to our present-day Sikh residents, and highlights an important chapter in the rich history of our region, of which we’re all proud.”

B.C.’s Stop of Interest signs were first installed in 1958 to commemorate the Colony of B.C.’s centenary and recognize significant historical places, people and events. The ministry is refurbishing existing signs in need of repair and updating language where necessary.

In addition, the Province is adding up to 75 new Stop of Interest signs. British Columbians are invited to submit ideas for new Stop of Interest signs and share interesting stories that could be told to people travelling B.C.’s highways. Submissions will be accepted through Jan. 31, 2017.

The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure will install the majority of the new Stop of Interest signs in late spring/early summer 2017.

7.5 kilograms of suspected cocaine seized at the Pacific Highway Commercial port of entry

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) is announcing the seizure of 107.5 kilograms of suspected cocaine at the Pacific Highway Commercial port of entry.

On October 21, 2016, a commercial driver travelling from the United States was seeking entry to Canada at the Pacific Highway Commercial port of entry (POE). During the commercial vehicle examination, border services officers (BSOs) discovered numerous bricks of a white powdered substance among a shipment of rice. After performing a field test, the suspected cocaine was seized.

The man and the drugs were turned over to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). The investigation is ongoing.

“Border services officers at the Pacific Highway Commercial POE are dedicated to strengthening the integrity of our borders and keeping Canadians safe. This significant seizure also highlights the important partnership between the CBSA and the RCMP in keeping Canadians safe by preventing illegal narcotics and prohibited goods from entering our communities,”  said Dan Bubas, Chief, Pacific Highway port of entry, CBSA.

Last year, BSOs at the Pacific Highway Commercial POE processed over 438,255 travellers and 407,207 commercial vehicles.

From 2011 to 2015, there were over 89 narcotic seizures at the Pacific Highway Commercial POE.

Anyone with information about suspicious cross-border activity is encouraged to call the CBSA Border Watch Toll-free Line at 1-888-502-9060.

Stabbing at Crown Banquet Hall, five injured

Surrey:  A fight between young people during a party held at Crown Banquet Hall leaves 4 injured with stab wounds  and one elderly woman suffering multiple injuries.

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Bloody Scene inside the banquet hall where the stabbing took place
Bloody Scene inside the banquet hall where the stabbing took place

On November 4th, 2016, just before midnight, Surrey RCMP received 911 call about  a large altercation occurring in the parking lot of a Banquet Hall in the 12000 Block of Nordel Way. Officers attended to the scene and observed a large group in the parking lot. A total of five persons, four of them with stab wounds, were located and transported to hospital with non-life threatening injuries. One of the victims was an elderly female that had been knocked down during the altercation and suffered multiple injuries.

All of the persons involved in the altercation are known to each other. A suspect has not yet been identified, but witnesses are still being spoken to. A neighbourhood canvas is presently being conducted for possible video footage of the altercation.

Anyone who may have witnessed the altercation or observed persons fleeing from the location of the incident is asked to call the Surrey RCMP at 604-599-0502 or to call Crime Stoppers.

Aman Sanghera charged in 2015 hit and run

Surrey RCMP has concluded the investigation into a 2015 hit and run investigation with charges now being sworn against a 27 year old Surrey man.

On April 6, 2015 at approximately 5:45pm, a police officer was conducting a traffic stop in the 12600 block of 92nd Avenue when he heard a noise. The officer observed a newer silver car driving away eastbound on 92nd Avenue and a person lying on the road.

The officer attempted to stop the fleeing vehicle however it failed to stop and was last seen travelling north bound on 128th Street through the intersection at 96th Avenue. Emergency personnel attended and located an 85 year old victim with serious injuries. The victim is recovering from the collision and is reported to be in stable condition.

The Surrey RCMP Criminal Collision Investigation Team (CCIT) led the investigation with assistance from the Integrated Collision and Reconstruction Service (ICARS). A thorough investigation was presented to Crown Counsel who approved charges.

Aman Sanghera, 27 years old, of Surrey, is now charged with Fail to stop at an accident causing bodily harm and Dangerous driving. Sanghera was arrested on November 3rd, appeared in court, and has subsequently been released pending his next court date.

“Hard work by investigators and intersection cameras helped to lead investigators to Sanghera who is alleged to have been the driver,” says Corporal Scotty Schumann.

Jawahar Singh Padda of Gateway Pizza in Surrey charges with four counts

Surrey: RCMP arrested the owner of Gateway Pizza, Jawahar Singh Padda on November 1st after police was called to Gateway Pizza.  Mr. Padda was taken into custody and later released on $25,000 bail.  Mr. Padda is facing four charges, including pointing a firearm, uttering threats, forcible confinement w/o lawful authority and assault.  Padda is expected to re-appear in front of Judge on November 24th 2016.

200 kg of cocaine was seized, Gurpreet Singh Cheema, Gurpreet Singh, Tejinderpal Singh Sandhu, Jasmail Singh Sander and Parmjeet Singh Sandhu charged

The Canada Border Services Agency, along with RCMP, show cocaine seized during a drug importation investigation at the Coutts border crossing that focused on commercial vehicles.

 

The Canada Border Services Agency, along with RCMP, show cocaine seized during a drug importation investigation at the Coutts border crossing that focused on commercial vehicles.

Global News / Braden Latam

 

RCMP say just over 200 kg of cocaine was seized in a drug importation investigation in southern Alberta that focused on commercial vehicles.

The drugs were seized at the Coutts border crossing on three separate dates.

During the first seizure on Sept. 2, Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officers searched a commercial truck entering Canada with a load of televisions.

According to the RCMP, officers discovered 60 packages of cocaine weighing 69 kg stashed in the vehicle.

The second seizure was two days later, on Sept. 4. CBSA officers searched a truck containing a shipment of novelty items.

According to RCMP, concealed within the load were 34 packages of cocaine.

Tejinderpal Singh Sandhu, 34, is charged with importing a controlled substance and possession of a controlled substance for the purpose of trafficking.

The third seizure took place on Oct. 10. According to the RCMP, CBSA officers found 83 bricks of cocaine hidden throughout the cab of a commercial vehicle carrying produce.

Jasmail Singh Sander, 53, of British Columbia, and Parmjeet Singh Sandhu, 31, of Ontario, are charged with possession of a controlled substance for the purpose of trafficking and importing a controlled substance.

In all three instances, the commercial trucks were operating for commercial trucking companies based in British Columbia.

The Canada Border Services Agency, along with RCMP, show cocaine seized during a drug importation investigation at the Coutts border crossing that focused on commercial vehicles.

The Canada Border Services Agency, along with RCMP, show cocaine seized during a drug importation investigation at the Coutts border crossing that focused on commercial vehicles.

Global News / Braden Latam