Women

Vancouver, –    In honour of International Women’s Day,  Vancouver-area women of all backgrounds are invited to take part in a special, free women’s event – the Multicultural Women’s Conference and Fair on March 25, 2017, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Croatian Cultural Centre (3250 Commercial Dr.).

Let’s keep the momentum of women’s issues moving forward with a positive, empowering event that aims to bring women of all backgrounds together to connect, learn and inspire each other. After all, balancing all the demands we place on ourselves as women is not easy. Neither is overcoming the external professional, gender and cultural challenges we encounter.

“Sometimes we need an event like the Multicultural Women’s Conference and Fair for an opportunity to be inspired, and gain new insights from other women,” says Margaret Jetelina, editor of Canadian Immigrant magazine, the presenter of the event. “It’s about learning and making connections, and moving women’s issues forward.”

Here’s an overview of the activities and workshops being offered at the Multicultural Women’s Conference and Fair:

9:45 a.m.: REGISTRATION OPENS AT DOOR

10 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.: WELCOME plus a special BollyX dance/fitness presentation by Clara Chan

 

10:15 a.m. to 4 p.m.: TRADESHOW OF EXHIBITORS, which includes:

  • free Resumé Clinic by MOSAIC

 

  • “Get your Corporate Headshot” station with photographer Maddie Adams

 

  • “Mini Manicure” station by Beauty Night Society

 

  • Women’s Empowerment Art Therapy sessions with art therapist and life coach Nicole Gfeller

 

10:30 a.m.:  TOOLS AND TIPS FOR STARTING YOUR BUSINESS with Alpana Sharma of Women’s Enterprise Centre

11:30 a.m.:  CAREERS WITH THE VPD + SAFETY DEMO with Detectives Andrea Dunn, Michelle Neufeld and Julie Birtch

12:30 p.m.:  BE MINDFUL, BE YOUR BEST with Jasmine Bharucha, realtor, author and singer

1 p.m.:  CONFIDENCE AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO CAREER SUCCESS with leadership coach Manpreet Dhillon

1:45 p.m.: THE WOMAN’S VOICE: SPEAKING TIPS with Catherine Steele of English Pronunciation for Success

2:15 p.m.: NETWORKING TRUTHS, TIPS AND TRICKS with Karen Southall Watts, entrepreneur and business trainer

2:45 p.m.: PARENTING WORKSHOP: THE POWER OF CONNECTION with Cheryl Song, parenting trainer and columnist

3:15 p.m.: CREATING A HAPPY BALANCE with Dr. Nareeta Stephenson of Strawberries and Sunshine Healing Centre

Registration for the event at www.canadianimmigrant.ca/womensfair<http://www.canadianimmigrant.ca/womensfair>.

For a spot in the art therapy group session, please email mjetelina@metroland.com.

(NC) Colouring hair at home is popular for many reasons: it saves time, money and can be much more convenient all while achieving great results. More than half of Canadian women colour their hair and, of those, half colour their hair at home, according to a recent poll. When asked what concerns them about using at home hair colour, the top concern raised by one-quarter of Canadian women was that they would not get the colour they want.

Luis Pacheco, Clairol’s Consulting Colourist, offers some tips to ensure women get the hair colour of their dreams.

Do a strand test. First, before colouring your hair, you should always do a patch test to ensure you don’t have any allergic reaction to the colour. Next, a strand test to ensure that you get the colour you want before you actually colour all of your hair. Not only can you test the shade, but you can ensure that you know how long to keep the colour on your hair for.

Don’t do a drastic colour change at home. There are times to seek out a professional colourist such as when you want to go drastically lighter or darker. The general rule of thumb for at-home colour is to stay within two shades lighter or two shades darker of your current colour.

Do try something new. Want to warm up your look summer? Try a colour with a bit of red in it or look for a colour with golden undertones. Clairol Nice ‘n Easy offers 44 natural-looking colours with colour-blend technology to ensure the result is full of depth and dimension. Have fun this summer and experiment with a new shade.

Don’t worry about choosing the right shade. Twenty per cent of Canadian women are concerned about choosing the right shade of hair colour. Choosing a you-only-better shade requires a little prep work but shouldn’t be intimidating. The first thing to consider is your skin tone. Take a look at the inside of your wrist. If your veins appear bluish, you should look for cool or neutral tones; if they’re greenish, look for warm or neutral tones. For warmer shades, look for the words golden, bronze, and copper. For cooler shades, look for the words ash, platinum, and Champagne. Then, select your colour based on going no more than two shades different from your current colour.

www.newscanada.com

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BY ABBY PHILLIP, THE WASHINGTON POST

The growth in popularity of dietary supplements has come largely despite a lack of scientific evidence to back up claims that they work.

There are, however, growing questions about their risks.

The latest: A new study, published in the British Journal of Cancer on Monday, found evidence of a troubling connection between men who took muscle-building supplements and their risk of developing testicular cancer.

Genes and family history factor into the likelihood that someone will develop testicular cancer, but those factors alone don’t explain why rates of this form of cancer have increased in the last few decades.

So researchers conducted a survey of almost 900 men from Massachusetts and Connecticut, asking them questions about their habits (supplement use, smokingdrinkingexercise and other factors) and family history of testicular cancer. Among the men surveyed, 356 had been diagnosed with testicular cancer and 513 were not diagnosed with the cancer.

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Researchers found a clear relationship between the use of muscle-building supplements and the risk of developing cancer even after controlling for other factors like race and age. Participants in the control group and the group with cancer had similar levels of education, prevalence of smoking, alcohol drinking and height.

“The observed relationship was strong,” Tongzhang Zheng, who led the study at Yale University, said in a statement. (Zheng is now a professor of epidemiology at Brown University School of Public Health.) “If you used at earlier age, you had a higher risk. If you used them longer, you had a higher risk. If you used multiple types, you had a higher risk.”

In this case, “use” means taking a supplement at least once a week for at least four consecutive weeks.

A representative for the Council for Responsible Nutrition, a leading trade association for the supplement industry, was not immediately available for comment.

Overall, men who used muscle-building supplements increased their risk of developing testicular cancer by 65 percent. Men who used more than one type of muscle building supplement had a 177 percent increase in risk. Men who used the supplements for three years or more had a 156 percent increase in risk. And men who started using supplements at the age of 25 or younger had a 121 percent increase in risk.

“Considering the magnitude of the association and the observed dose-response trends, muscle-building supplements use may be an important and modifiable exposure that could have important scientific and clinical importance for preventing testicular germ cell cancer development if this association is confirmed by future studies,” the authors note in the study.

Critically, the study doesn’t specifically name supplements that were used by the study’s participants but they included 30 different types of powders and pills. Among the major ingredients were creatine, protein, and androstenedione. And the results suggest a relationship between supplement use and cancer, but it don’t prove that the supplements cause cancer.

Additional clinical experiments will need to be conducted in order to confirm the results.

But recent research has raised questions about the potential harm posed by dietary supplements on the lightly regulated market, whose sales reached $13 billion in 2013. Previous research has linked ingredients in performance-enhancing supplements to a substance that caused testicular damage in rats. Another has shown a high prevalence of performance-enhancing supplement use among people diagnosed with testicular cancer.

 

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Washington: A new study has revealed that new evidence linking high exposure to air pollution to an increased risk of congenital malformations have been discovered.

The nationwide study is the first to assess the association between different modes of conception-assisted reproductive technology (ART) versus spontaneous conception (SC) — and the risks of exposure to air pollution to each.

The research team analyzed data on 216,730 born in Israel between 1997 and 2004. Air pollution data, including levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter (PM10), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and ozone (O3), were obtained from air monitoring stations for the study period. Using a geographic information system, exposure to air pollution during both the first trimester and the entire pregnancy was assessed for each woman according to her place of residence.

The researchers found that exposure to PM10 and NOX pollutants throughout full-term pregnancies were associated with an increased risk of congenital malformations, with specific defects evident in the circulatory system (from PM10 and NOX exposure) and genital organs (from NOX exposure). They also discovered that exposure to SO2 and O3 in ART pregnancies were associated, although not significantly, with a higher risk of congenital defects.

The researchers said that the findings suggest that exposure to higher levels of air pollution during pregnancy is associated with various adverse pregnancy outcomes.
The study was published in Environmental Research. (ANI)

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by Linda Melone

 

Lack of sleep isn’t the only thing sapping your energy. Little things you do (and don’t do) can exhaust you both mentally and physically, which can make getting through your day a chore. Here, experts reveal common bad habits that can make you feel tired, plus simple lifestyle tweaks that will put the pep back in your step.

Skipping your workout to save energy actually works against you. In a University of Georgia study, sedentary but otherwise healthy adults who began exercising lightly three days a week for as little as 20 minutes at a time reported feeling less fatigued and more energized after six weeks. Regular exercise boosts strength and endurance, helps make your cardiovascular system run more efficiently, and delivers oxygen and nutrients to your tissues. So next time you’re tempted to crash on the couch, at least go for a brisk walk—you won’t regret it. (Health.com)

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Washington, Oct 17 (ANI): In a recent pilot study it was discovered that after 12 weeks of daily 10 milligram (mg) doses of an investigational fermented soy germ-based nutritional supplement S-equol, have led to improvements in post-menopausal women who experienced in vaginal atrophy.

S-equol has the ability to bind to the same estrogen receptors as naturally occurring estrogen, when bound to the receptor, S-equol would mimick some, but not all, activities of estrogen. This ability of S-equol at the receptor has indicated that it may alleviate some symptoms caused by diminished estrogen production during menopause.

Coauthor Belinda H. Jenks, Ph.D., director of Scientific Affairs & Nutrition Education at Pharmavite LLC said that the data documented had reported improved vaginal epithelium, without significant abnormalities in vaginal cells, endometrial thickening, hormone levels or genital bleeding, which has added to the known safety profile of this S-equol supplement that was previously shown to have helped relieve certain menopause symptoms.

Researchers have also suggested that daily doses of the supplement containing S-equol, a metabolite of the soy isoflavone daidzein, could relieve hot flash frequency, muscle and joint pain, as was reported in a previously published controlled clinical trials in both U.S. and Japanese postmenopausal women.